The Neue Galerie exhibit's empty frames represent paintings that were lost or destroyed by the Nazis. They appear beside works that survived Nazi rule, like George Grosz's Portrait of the Writer Max Hermann-Neisse (lower right). Courtesy of Hulya Kolabas for Neue Galerie New York hide caption

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Joan Brown's 1970 Self-Portrait with Fish and Cat is the first image you see at the National Portrait Gallery's "Face Value" exhibit. Estate of Joan Brown/Courtesy of George Adams Gallery/National Portrait Gallery hide caption

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Yellowstone serigraphs, circa 1939. Courtesy of Doug Leen and the Interior Museum hide caption

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In a letter, Mary Cassatt describes working on Little Girl in a Blue Armchair (1878) with Edward Degas. An X-ray of the painting reveals brush strokes unlike Cassatt's regular strokes. National Gallery of Art hide caption

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Rufus Reid has played with just about everybody in the mainstream jazz world. His latest project, Quiet Pride, is based on works by the late sculptor and civil rights activist Elizabeth Catlett. Jimmy Katz/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Viewers of Kara Walker's A Subtlety described the sculpture as "beautiful" and "the American sphinx." Another said, "She is so exposed and she's so vulnerable, but at the same time she has some grace and majesticness that is completely unapproachable." Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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Two pensive women share a mysterious, intense moment in Raphael Soyer's 1980 Annunciation. Smithsonian American Art Museum hide caption

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Johann Zoffany's 18th century painting portrays Dido Elizabeth Belle and her cousin Elizabeth Murray. Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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In 1910, Lithuanian artist Ben Zion Black painted the interior of Burlington's Chai Adam Synagogue. Much of the painting was destroyed when the building underwent renovations. Courtesy of the Ohavi Zedek Synagogue hide caption

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In the restored San Gennaro catacombs, mosaics like this are lit with high-tech lighting paid for by grants from big corporations. Courtesy of the San Gennaro Catacombs hide caption

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Andrew Winter's Gulls at Monhegan was lost after it was given — wrongly — to an American ambassador to Costa Rica when he retired. Courtesy of the U.S. GSA Fine Arts Program hide caption

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