The right eye of Leonardo da Vinci's "Mona Lisa." On Aug. 21, 1911, the then-little-known painting was stolen from the wall of the Louvre in Paris. And a legend was born. Associated Press hide caption

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The Theft That Made The 'Mona Lisa' A Masterpiece

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'The Clock': Watching A 24-Hour Film

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The High Museum of Art commissioned nendo, a Japanese design collective, to create Visible Structures — a 12-piece installation of furniture made out of form core and cardboard, reinforced with graphite tape. Masayuki Hayashi hide caption

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Form And Function Meet In 'Modern By Design'

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Samuel F. B. Morse, Gallery of the Louvre, 1831–1833, oil on canvas. Click here to enlarge. Richard House/Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection/Courtesy of the National Gallery of Art hide caption

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The Best Of The Louvre, On A Single Canvas

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A visitor looks at paintings at the Barnes Foundation in Lower Merion, Pa. The art collection is moving to a new building in downtown Philadelphia. Jessica Griffin/AP hide caption

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Barnes Gallery Draws Art Lovers For One Last Look

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The Cone sisters typically forged strong patron-artist relationships, but they were particularly close with Henri Matisse. While working on Large Reclining Nude, Matisse sent 22 photographs of the work in progress to Etta Cone. The Baltimore Museum of Art hide caption

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A Tale Of Two Sisters And Their Serious Eye For Art

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A self-portrait by Rembrandt, valued at $36 million, was taken from the Swedish National Museum in 2000. Robert Wittman, founder of the FBI's Art Crime Team, went undercover — as an authenticator for an Eastern European mob group — to recover it. Swedish National Museum hide caption

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Robert Wittman's 'Priceless' Pursuit Of Stolen Art

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Lillian Bassman's photograph The V‐Back Evenings shows model and actress Suzy Parker having a drink (and some fun) in 1955. Lillian Bassman/Harper's Bazaar hide caption

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A Spirited Celebration Of America's 'Cocktail Culture'

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Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas, Aix-les-Bains, France, circa 1927 Yale Collection of American Literature/Contemporary Jewish Museum hide caption

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Gertrude Stein Through Artists' Eyes

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Venus Makes A Rare Visit To D.C.'s National Gallery

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Impressionist paintings of Paris often depict a city full of sun-dappled socialites: dancing, shopping, boating and schmoozing. But for painter and art patron Gustave Caillebotte, Paris was a darker, lonelier place. His 1877 work, Paris Street; Rainy Day, shows Parisians making their way down a vast street on a dreary day. (Click enlarge to see the full painting.) The Art Institute of Chicago hide caption

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Gustave Caillebotte: Impressions Of A Changing Paris

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Former Olympian Gary Morgan runs on a treadmill atop an overturned tank in Track and Field, by Jennifer Allora and Guillermo Calzadilla. The piece is part of the American Pavilion at the Venice Biennale. Tascha Horowitz/Courtesy of the Indianapolis Museum of Art hide caption

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Art As 'Smart Power' At The Venice Biennale

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Metsu's 1664 painting A Man Writing a Letter depicts a handsome young scribe penning his correspondence in an opulent study. Roy Hewson/National Gallery of Ireland hide caption

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Gabriel Metsu: The Dutch Master You Don't Know

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This 4th century B.C. stone sculpture of Aphrodite, goddess of love, was illegally excavated from Sicily. The Getty Museum purchased it in 1988. In 2007, the Getty agreed to return it — along with 40 other disputed artifacts — to the Italian government. The goddess will be officially installed at her new home — a small museum in Sicily — on Tuesday. AP hide caption

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'Chasing Aphrodite' And Other Dirty Art World Deals

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The Soumaya Museum in Mexico City was designed by Carlos Slim's son-in-law and houses Slim's collection of more than 65,000 pieces. It is dominated by works from European and Mexican artists. Walter Shintani/LatinContent/Getty Images hide caption

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World's Richest Man Opens Flashy Museum In Mexico

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