Care To Offset All Your Office Sitting? It'll Take Just An Hour A Day

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Surplus corn is piled outside a storage silo in Paoli, Colo. Do federal farm subsidies encourage the production — and perhaps overconsumption — of things that we're told to eat less of, like high fructose corn syrup or meat produced from livestock raised on subsidized grains? Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Wellness Programs Take Aim At Workplace Stress

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Exercise physiologist Courtney Conners checks Mario Oikonomides' vital signs before his cardiac rehab workout at the University of Virginia Health System clinic. Francis Ying/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Cardiac Rehab Saves Lives. So Why Don't More Heart Patients Sign Up?

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A new study finds people who are well-hydrated have lower body weights and lower odds of obesity. Klaus Vedfelt/Getty Images hide caption

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Thirsty? New Study Links Good Hydration To Slimmer Waistlines

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Overworked Americans Aren't Taking The Vacation They've Earned

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A Caesar salad kit. Americans buy twice as many packages of bagged salad greens as heads of lettuce these days. Is the bagged stuff just as good? If it gets you to eat more leafy greens, yes. Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

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As Bagged Salad Kits Boom, Americans Eat More Greens

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Sweet potato evangelist Maria Isabel Andrade drives around Mozambique in her orange Toyota Land Cruiser in 2012. She is one of four researchers honored with the World Food Prize for promoting the crop to combat malnutrition. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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An illustration shows spikes of different types of wheat: (1) Polish wheat (2) Club wheat (3) Common bread wheat (4) Poulard wheat (5) Durum wheat (6) Spelt (7) Emmer (8) Einkorn. The Library of Congress/Flickr The Commons hide caption

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The new brewery at Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, N.Y. The school now teaches the art and science of brewing, an elective course. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Fermentation Fervor: Here's How Chefs Boost Flavor And Health

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Researchers have long known that exercise is good for the brain. An enzyme produced by muscles might help explain why. Monalyn Gracia/Corbis/VCG/Getty Images hide caption

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A Protein That Moves From Muscle To Brain May Tie Exercise To Memory

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The Text4Baby app sends free, periodic text messages in Spanish or English to pregnant women and new moms about prenatal care, labor and delivery, breastfeeding, developmental milestones and immunizations. Kristin Adair/NPR hide caption

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