An illustration shows spikes of different types of wheat: (1) Polish wheat (2) Club wheat (3) Common bread wheat (4) Poulard wheat (5) Durum wheat (6) Spelt (7) Emmer (8) Einkorn. The Library of Congress/Flickr The Commons hide caption

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The new brewery at Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, N.Y. The school now teaches the art and science of brewing, an elective course. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Fermentation Fervor: Here's How Chefs Boost Flavor And Health

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Researchers have long known that exercise is good for the brain. An enzyme produced by muscles might help explain why. Monalyn Gracia/Corbis/VCG/Getty Images hide caption

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A Protein That Moves From Muscle To Brain May Tie Exercise To Memory

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The Text4Baby app sends free, periodic text messages in Spanish or English to pregnant women and new moms about prenatal care, labor and delivery, breastfeeding, developmental milestones and immunizations. Kristin Adair/NPR hide caption

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Silicon Valley-based Impossible Foods has taken a high-tech approach to creating a plant-based burger that smells and tastes like real meat. At the company's headquarters in Redwood City, Calif., chef Traci Des Jardins served the Impossible Burger (pictured uncooked) with vegan mayo, Dijon mustard, mashed avocado, caramelized onions, chopped cornichon, tomato and lettuce on a pretzel bun. Maggie Carson Jurow hide caption

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Coffee gets the all-clear from the World Health Organization's cancer research agency. Rob MacEwen/Flickr hide caption

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Java Lovers, Rejoice: Coffee Doesn't Pose A Cancer Risk, WHO Panel Says

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Opponents of a proposed sugary drink tax demonstrate outside City Hall in Philadelphia on June 8. The Philadelphia City Council is set to consider a sugary drink tax that Mayor Jim Kenney wants to pay for universal prekindergarten, community schools and park improvements. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Can The Soda Industry's $4 Million Ad Blitz Fend Off A Sugary Drink Tax?

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Why did humans start cultivating celery? It's low-calorie and, one might argue, low flavor. We asked some experts at the intersection of botany and anthropology to share their best guesses. Cora Niele/Getty Images hide caption

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Beyonce inked a $50 million endorsement deal with Pepsi in 2012. Walter McBride/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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This Is How Much Celebrities Get Paid To Endorse Soda And Unhealthy Food

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Seth Barker of Maine Fresh Sea Farms checks a seaweed line. People have foraged wild seaweed off the Eastern Seaboard for centuries. But now a much more active effort to grow seaweed in the U.S. is afoot. Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Seaweed On Your Dinner Plate: The Next Kale Could Be Kelp

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A typical label includes safe cooking instructions. This label on blade-tenderized beef sold at Costco recommends 160 degrees as the minimum internal temperature, which doesn't require a three-minute rest time. Lydia Zuraw/KHN for NPR hide caption

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Coming soon: The redesigned nutrition facts label will highlight added sugars in food. The label also will display calories per serving, and serving size, more prominently. U.S. Food and Drug Administration hide caption

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