The defending champion and favorite remains the chicken wing. But underdog snacks like the carrot are trying to elbow their way into the competition. Leif Parsons for NPR; Source: whologwhy/Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption Leif Parsons for NPR; Source: whologwhy/Flickr

Ideally, we'd all eat super healthful diets. But that's not the world we live in, and multivitamins may help bridge the nutritional gaps. Jasper White/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Jasper White/Getty Images

A baked potato with toppings on a lunch tray at a school in Wisconsin. Students are less likely to eat fruits and vegetables if they're rushing to get to recess, researchers say. Micheal Sears/MCT/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Micheal Sears/MCT/Landov

Oh, sugar! If this time of year has you rethinking your diet, there is one surefire change you can make to improve health: Cut back on sugar. Farrukh/Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption Farrukh/Flickr

Sure, these Buffalo-chicken-and-kale-stuffed mushrooms look tasty, but they aren't the giant bowl of salt and corn syrup your brain really, really wants. Matthew Mead/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Matthew Mead/AP

Jasjit Kaur Singh, an Indian chef, cooks kaala channa, a traditional spicy Sikh dish. A psychologist says that children who grow up in cultures with lots of spicy food are taught to like spice early on. Richard Lautens/Toronto Star via Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Richard Lautens/Toronto Star via Getty Images

The 5:2 diet calls for two days per week of minifasting where the aim is to go a long stretch, say 14 to 18 hours, without eating. During these two fasting days, you also eat only about 600 calories, give or take. Viennaslide/the food passionat/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Viennaslide/the food passionat/Corbis

The University of California's Nutrition Policy Institute has proposed that MyPlate include an icon for water. UC Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources hide caption

itoggle caption UC Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources

One reason cooking at home might be linked to poor health? Researchers say it could be because there are too many unhealthful baked goods coming out of the oven. Amriphoto/iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption Amriphoto/iStockphoto