Kara Dethlefsen, an active-duty Marine, attends the monthly food pantry at the Camp Pendleton Marine Corps Base near San Diego. Her husband is also a Marine. She says the food assistance is helping them get ready for his transition back to civilian life. The couple has a 4-month-old daughter. Dorian Merina/KPCC hide caption

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Dorian Merina/KPCC

'Powwow Sweat' Promotes Fitness Through Traditional Dance

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Allie Wist's "Flooded" dinner spread includes burdock and dandelion root hummus with sunchoke chips; jellyfish salad; roasted hen of the woods mushroom; fried potatoes with chipotle vegan mayo; salted anchovies; and oysters with slippers. Most of these are foods that might be more resilient to climate change and, therefore, what we could be eating in the future, Wist says. Heami Lee/Courtesy of Allie Wist, food stylist C.C. Buckley, prop stylist Rebecca Bartoshesy hide caption

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Heami Lee/Courtesy of Allie Wist, food stylist C.C. Buckley, prop stylist Rebecca Bartoshesy

For people with celiac disease gluten-free food is a must. A new study suggests that a common virus may trigger the onset of the disease. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Archaeologists have suggested that Stone Age people sometimes ate one another for nutritional reasons. But a new study suggests that from a calorie perspective, hunting and eating other humans wasn't efficient. Publiphoto/Science Source hide caption

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Publiphoto/Science Source

A family sells pastries in Mexico City. As Mexicans' wages have risen, their average daily intake of calories has soared. Meghan Dhaliwal/for NPR hide caption

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Meghan Dhaliwal/for NPR

How Diabetes Got To Be The No. 1 Killer In Mexico

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An appeals court hears arguments Wednesday on the future of Philly's landmark tax on sweetened drinks. The money is funding preschool for low-income kids, but the soda industry says it's losing jobs. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Allison Aubrey/NPR

Judges Take Up Big Soda's Suit To Abolish Philadelphia's Sugar Tax

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Bone broth has become so popular these days that the bones used to make it are getting harder — and more expensive — for broth retailers to source. Alex Reynolds/NPR hide caption

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Alex Reynolds/NPR

Would having to wait 25 seconds for your snack prompt you to make healthier choices at the vending machine? New research suggests the answer is yes. M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

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M. Spencer Green/AP

Scenes from inside greenhouse No. 2 at Wholesum Farms Sonora. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Amid Talk Of Tariffs, What Happens To Companies That Straddle The Border?

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