A waiter carries beers at the Theresienwiese fair grounds of the Oktoberfest beer festival in Munich, southern Germany, last September. For centuries, a German law has stipulated that beer can only be made from four ingredients. But as Germany embraces craft beer, some believe the law impedes good brewing. Karl-Josef Hildenbrand/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Germany's Beer Purity Law Is 500 Years Old. Is It Past Its Sell-By Date?
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Chobani CEO Hamdi Ulukaya (left) presents an employee with shares of the company on Tuesday at the Chobani plant in New Berlin, in upstate New York. Johannes Arlt hide caption

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Why Chobani Gave Employees A Financial Stake In Company's Future
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Cybil Preston, chief apiary inspector for the Maryland Department of Agriculture, does a training run with Mack: She sets up fake beehives and commands him to "find." He sniffs each of them to check for American foulbrood. He has been trained to sit to notify Preston if he detects the disease. Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

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The staple at legendary Prince's is fiery hot fried chicken, always served on white bread, with pickles. Danielle Atkins/Courtesy of Spring House Press hide caption

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How A Cheating Man Gave Rise To Nashville's Hot Chicken Craze
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Harriet Tubman, pictured between 1860 and 1875. The woman who will soon become the first African-American to grace an American currency note self-funded many of her heroic raids to save slaves by cooking. H.B. Lindsley/Library of Congress via AP hide caption

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Questlove's previous books include Mo' Meta Blues and Soul Train. He also teaches a class about classic albums at New York University. Ben Watts/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Questlove On Prince, Doo-Wop And The Food Equivalent Of The 'Mona Lisa'
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The earliest records of tiger nuts date back to ancient Egypt, where they were valuable and loved enough to be entombed and discovered with buried Egyptians as far back as the 4th millennium B.C. Now, tiger nuts are making a comeback in the health food aisle. Nutritionally, they do OK. Matailong Du/NPR hide caption

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A child runs a shopping cart relay during an Education Department summer enrichment event, "Let's Read, Let's Move." The 2012 event was part of a summer initiative to engage youths in summer reading and physical activity, and provide them information about healthy, affordable food. Many efforts underway are aimed at getting people to think anew about their daily habits. Chris Maddaloni/CQ-Roll Call/Getty Images hide caption

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Wendell Berry, America's foremost farmer-philosopher, with horses on his farm. Courtesy of Platform Media Group hide caption

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The Gospel According To Wendell Berry, On Screen
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A Passover Seder table. During Passover, Jews avoid leavened bread. But whether legumes, corn and rice are OK has long been a point of contention among Jews of European and Middle Eastern ancestry. Now, rabbis have weighed in. Reza/Getty Images hide caption

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Beans And Rice For Passover? A Divisive Question Gets The Rabbis' OK
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An illustration depicts a scene from Shakespeare's Coriolanus, a play that opens with citizens armed with "staves, clubs, and other weapons" in protest against the city fathers they accuse of hoarding grain. In Shakespeare's day, food shortages tore through England — and the bard himself was fined for grain hoarding. Nicolas Poussin/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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The World Resources Institute says you don't have to bid burgers bye-bye in order to reduce the environmental footprint of what you eat. For Americans, cutting back on beef (but not eliminating it altogether) could go a long way, it says. iStockphoto hide caption

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McDonald's is super popular in Israel — the chain even offers potato-starch hamburger buns, like this one, that are kosher for Passover. But now McD's is fighting back against the Israeli health ministry's accusations that it's "junk food." Daniel Estrin for NPR hide caption

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Manischewitz is closely associated with Jewish tradition, but it was once a huge crossover success. Sammy Davis Jr. was its spokesman in TV advertising. At one point, the typical drinker was described as an urban African-American man. Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

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