The new brewery at Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, N.Y. The school now teaches the art and science of brewing, an elective course. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Fermentation Fervor: Here's How Chefs Boost Flavor And Health

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The seed library maintained by the Jijak Foundation contains dozens of native varieties of corn, beans, tobacco, watermelon and ancient squash. Rebecca Williams/Michigan Radio hide caption

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Anti-Brexit supporters dressed as bananas protest outside a racecourse in York, England. "It is absolutely crazy that the EU is telling us what shape our bananas have got to be," says Brexit's foremost cheerleader, Boris Johnson, the former mayor of London, invoking one of the oldest and most persistent tall tales about EU bureaucracy. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images hide caption

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Silicon Valley-based Impossible Foods has taken a high-tech approach to creating a plant-based burger that smells and tastes like real meat. At the company's headquarters in Redwood City, Calif., chef Traci Des Jardins served the Impossible Burger (pictured uncooked) with vegan mayo, Dijon mustard, mashed avocado, caramelized onions, chopped cornichon, tomato and lettuce on a pretzel bun. Maggie Carson Jurow hide caption

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Marybong Estate, second flush. Jeff Koehler hide caption

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Darjeeling 2.0: Last Auction Of India's 'Champagne Of Teas' Goes Digital

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Fish Have Feelings, Too: The Inner Lives Of Our 'Underwater Cousins'

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"Supposedly, tea cakes were made about 200 years ago. Slaves used the ingredients they had: molasses instead of sugar, lard instead of butter," says Etha Robinson. Karen Grigsby Bates hide caption

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The John C. Sullenger Vineyard at Nickel & Nickel Winery, Napa Valley, Calif. Nickel & Nickel collaborated with scientists to collect wine samples and identify the bacteria and fungi in them by sequencing microbial DNA. Jason Tinacci/Courtesy of Nickel & Nickel hide caption

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Inside one of Mastronardi Produce Sunset Grown's greenhouses, tomato vines hang on lines that can be adjusted so that the tomatoes are always at a height that's convenient for harvesting. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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How Canada Became A Greenhouse Superpower

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