Chef Michael Scelfo of Cambridge, Mass., left, and Lisa Carlson, who operates three food trucks in Minneapolis, collaborate on the Glynwood dinner's spelt salad with lamb tongues and hearts, and "ugly" cherries, shiitakes, and kale. Lela Nargi/NPR hide caption

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Lela Nargi/NPR

Mueller plans to build his chicken barns in this cornfield just south of his home. His barns would house "breeders," the hens that lay the eggs that will hatch to be raised for meat. Grant Gerlock/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Grant Gerlock/Harvest Public Media

Dead Canary Islands date palms, killed by red palm weevils, line a road in La Mersa, Tunis, Tunisia. Courtesy of Mark Hoddle/Department of Entomology, University of California Riverside hide caption

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Courtesy of Mark Hoddle/Department of Entomology, University of California Riverside

'Epicurious' Editor Goes Inside The Home To Find Greatest Chefs

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Ten international cheesemongers competed to be named the best cheesemonger in the world at Mondial du Fromage. Nathalie Vanhaver, from Belgium, in center, took gold. Christophe Gonzalez, from France, on the left, won silver; and for the first time ever, an American, Nadjeeb Chouaf, took home the bronze. Courtesy of Rodolphe Le Meunier/Deedee Dorzee hide caption

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Courtesy of Rodolphe Le Meunier/Deedee Dorzee

Cows graze near Murwillumbah, New South Wales, Australia. China has replaced the United States as the second-largest foreign owner of agricultural land in Australia. (The UK is No. 1.) Auscape/Getty Images hide caption

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Why Is China Snatching Up Australian Farmland?

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Guests attend a Refugees Welcome dinner at Lapis restaurant in Washington, D.C. The goals of the evening: to bring locals together with refugees in their community and to break barriers by breaking bread. Beck Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Beck Harlan/NPR

Coffee is thought to have originated in Ethiopia. Coffea arabica, or coffee Arabica, the species that produces most of the world's coffee, is indigenous to the country. Courtesy of Alan Schaller hide caption

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Courtesy of Alan Schaller

Linda Fortune's family was forced out of District Six when she was 22. Growing up, the family often ate crayfish her father caught as a hobby. "If you had an overabundance of fish, you would share it with the neighbors," she recalls. Alan Greenblatt/NPR hide caption

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Alan Greenblatt/NPR

Survey Asked: Where Does Chocolate Milk Come From?

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The Rising Price Of Butter Could Be A Harbinger Of A French Croissant Crisis

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Analysts say that the experience of shopping at Whole Foods might change in the near future now that the retailer is being bought by Amazon. Stephen Hilger/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Alarming Number Of Americans Believe Chocolate Milk Comes From Brown Cows

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Children's book author Roald Dahl and his daughter Lucy. "Food was a huge part of our upbringing," Lucy Dahl says. Her father delighted his children with fanciful "midnight feasts" in the woods and often used mealtime to test out new characters from stories he was working on. Courtesy of Michael Faircloth hide caption

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Courtesy of Michael Faircloth

Workers spread "red vanilla" (vanilla that has been treated by special cooking) in the sun to be dried near Sambava, Madagascar, in May 2016. Madagascar, producer of 80 percent of the world's vanilla, has seen huge jumps in the price. It's one of the most labor-intensive foods on Earth. Rijasolo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rijasolo/AFP/Getty Images

Our Love Of 'All Natural' Is Causing A Vanilla Shortage

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