Louisville Paper Apologizes For Each Of Its Hot Dog Mistakes

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Hamilton-inspired cupcake toppers. It was only a matter of time before fans of the Broadway hit sought out culinary tributes to their most treasured folk hero. Courtesy of Alexis Murphy hide caption

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Courtesy of Alexis Murphy

A fisherman holds out a fish for a seal off of a boat owned by Carlos Rafael in New Bedford, Mass. Rafael was the biggest fishing magnate in America's most lucrative port. As he faces sentencing for a scheme to cheat fishing quotas, many worry about the fate of local jobs if his empire is dismantled. Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe/Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe/Getty Images

Sentencing Approaches for New England's 'Codfather'

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An empty coffee mug, left forlorn on the table. Federal regulators found that "New of Kopi Jantan Tradisional Natural Herbs Coffee" had an ingredient similar to the active ingredient in Viagra. Ezra Bailey/Getty Images hide caption

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Ezra Bailey/Getty Images

A vintage postcard from the Peach Tree State. Georgia isn't the biggest producer of the pink-orange fruit. So why are its peaches so iconic? The answer has a lot to do with slavery — its end and a need for the South to rebrand itself. Found Image Holdings Inc/Getty Images hide caption

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Found Image Holdings Inc/Getty Images

"The goats are kind of cool," says former inmate Chad Redding. "The females are like dogs — they just want your attention." Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

What's It Really Like To Work In A Prison Goat Milk Farm? We Asked Inmates

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The YouTube Star Who's Teaching Kids How To Bake

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An image of Penicillium colonies. The white colony is a mutant similar to the mold found in Camembert cheese. The green ones are the wild form. Courtesy of Benjamin Wolfe hide caption

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Courtesy of Benjamin Wolfe

Italy's Coffee Culture Brims With Rituals And Mysterious Rules

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With an American honeybee queen for a mother and a European honeybee drone for a father, this worker bee has a level of genetic diversity unseen in the U.S. for decades. Researchers at Washington State University hope a deeper gene pool will give a new generation of honeybees much-needed genetic traits, like resistance to varroa mites. The parasite kills a third of American honeybees each year. Megan Asche/Courtesy of Washington State University hide caption

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Megan Asche/Courtesy of Washington State University

A farmer checks on produce at Padao Farms, a 15-acre plot run by the Yang family in Fresno, Calif., that specializes in Asian greens. Courtesy of Asian Pacific Islander Forward Movement hide caption

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Courtesy of Asian Pacific Islander Forward Movement

A study conducted by the University of Chemistry and Technology in Prague compared some two dozen products sold in the Czech Republic with their equivalents in Germany. The Iglo brand fish sticks tested by the university contained 7 percent less fish than the same product sold in Germany. Like_the_Grand_Canyon/Flickr hide caption

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Like_the_Grand_Canyon/Flickr

Elise Tries Engay food. Illustration by CJ Riculan/NPR hide caption

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Illustration by CJ Riculan/NPR

Video: Japan Created Easy-To-Swallow Foods To Prevent Senior Choking Deaths

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