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Anthony Bourdain On 'Appetites,' Washing Dishes And The Food He Still Won't Eat

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Fresh fish fillets for sale in a display case. Concerns over animal welfare have led to changes in recent years in raising livestock. But seafood has been missing from the conversation. One group aims to change that. kali9/Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Guerrero fills barrels with crushed grapes at Valley of the Moon winery in Sonoma, Calif., Oct 16, 2017. Guerrero says he's struggling to pay for rent after the wildfires forced the winery to close. Farida Jhabvala Romero/KQED hide caption

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Farida Jhabvala Romero/KQED

A handmade sign is seen attached to the Napa Valley welcome sign on Oct. 16, 2017 in Oakville, Calif. At least 40 people are confirmed dead, dozens are still missing, and at least 5,700 buildings have been destroyed since wildfires broke out a week ago. Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images hide caption

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Onlookers watch as suited men stand in front of a large copper kettle still for making illegal liquor, with boxes of bottles and funnels spread before them all for the manufacture of booze, circa 1900. Buyenlarge/Getty Images hide caption

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Rasika chef Vikram Sunderam, here with a towering dish of eggplant and potato, says, "Indian cuisine is a very personal cuisine. It's made from family to family, how they like to cook." Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Ari Shapiro/NPR

In New Cookbook, Acclaimed Indian Restaurant Finally Spills Its Secrets

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In trying to get people to eat the Pez Diablo, or suckermouth catfish, sustainable fisheries specialist Mike Mitchell says it isn't "a problem of biology or science, but marketing." DeAgostini/Getty Images hide caption

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Executive producer and narrator chef Anthony Bourdain attends the premiere of Wasted! The Story of Food Waste in New York City. Brent N. Clarke/Brent N. Clarke/Invision/AP hide caption

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Brent N. Clarke/Brent N. Clarke/Invision/AP

A trip to Ann Arbor, Mich., wouldn't be complete without a visit to Zingerman's. A new cookbook shares some no-nonsense recipes that seem like they're just an oven-preheat away from appearing warm and fresh in your kitchen. Brittany Greeson/Getty Images hide caption

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Brittany Greeson/Getty Images

CANADA - OCTOBER 01: Author - Kazuo Ishiguro (Photo by Rick Eglinton/Toronto Star via Getty Images) Rick Eglinton/Toronto Star via Getty Images hide caption

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Rick Eglinton/Toronto Star via Getty Images

Chip Councell's ancestors began farming on Maryland's Eastern Shore in 1690. He says that in today's world, U.S. farmers have to look abroad for markets. John Ydstie/NPR hide caption

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John Ydstie/NPR

As Trump Moves To Renegotiate NAFTA, U.S. Farmers Are Hopeful But Nervous

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Acheson recommends looking for simple slow cookers with heavy insert pans. Brittany Lynne/Flickr hide caption

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Brittany Lynne/Flickr

'The Chef And The Slow Cooker': An Old Technology That's Newly Relevant

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Brent Henderson harvests soybeans on his farm near Weona, Ark. "If it's going to be legal to use and neighbors are planting it, I'm going to have to plant [dicamba-tolerant soybeans] to protect myself," he says. "It's very annoying. ... My neighbor should not dictate what I do on my farm." Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR