New Orleans Chef Paul Prudhomme prepares barbecue shrimp at the annual White House Congressional Picnic in 2007. Marvin Joseph/Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The city of Fort Bragg, Calif., has ordered restaurants to drastically reduce the amount of dishwashing by serving customers with disposable plates, cups and flatware. Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

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Students sort grapes at the University of California, Davis research winery. The winery is experimenting with various methods to conserve water. The hope is that commercial wineries will follow suit. Courtesy of Karen L Block/UC Davis hide caption

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The debate about sustainable diets has focused on meat production, which requires lots of land and water to grow grain to feed livestock. It also contributes to methane emissions. But the Cabinet secretaries with final authority say the 2015 dietary guidelines won't include sustainability goals. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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A view of Canton (Guangzhou), on the Pearl River in China, circa 1840. Canton was already a great trading port when the American ship Empress of China arrived in 1784 to fill up its hold with tea. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Solomonov describes Israeli-style hummus as "a marriage of chickpeas and tehina." Michael Persico/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt hide caption

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Andris Roder (left) and Adam Finding, cooks at the Kisuzem restaurant in Budapest, prepare a traditional Eritrean meal of injera bread, chickpea paste and meat stew. Their restaurant served up Eritrean food all week for a food festival in solidarity with migrants and refugees streaming into Hungary. Lauren Frayer for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Lauren Frayer for NPR

Modern, domesticated rice comes in a range of colors, usually described as white, red and black. But collectors have never found black grains in more than a thousand samples of wild rice stored in gene banks. Now geneticists have traced this rare grain's origin and spread. Courtesy of Takeshi Ebitani/Takuya Yamaguchi. hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Takeshi Ebitani/Takuya Yamaguchi.

Wing Gourds: According to Phil Rupp, president of Rupp Seeds, many years ago an Amish woman from Pennsylvania sent Phil's father, Roger Rupp, then head of the company, photos of an interesting gourd she'd developed. Roger hadn't seen anything like them, so he agreed to market them. The woman sent in some seeds, and from there Rupp's popular line of wing gourds was born. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Ariel Zambelich/NPR