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On Friday, Terry Work stands outside a store that accepts food stamps in Bon Aqua, Tenn. Work's 27-year-old deaf son recently was denied disability payments, meaning he is considered able-bodied. Now he stands to lose his food stamps, even though he has trouble keeping a job because of his deafness, she says. Work requirements began kicking in this month for a million SNAP benefit recipients. Mark Humphrey/AP hide caption

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Mark Humphrey/AP

Exposure to visual food cues like food ads can influence eating behavior and contribute to weight gain, a study published in the journal Obesity Reviews found. Nick Amoscato/Flickr hide caption

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Nick Amoscato/Flickr

Project Nourished's virtual eating gizmos. From left: An atomizer that releases the scents of a food; a virtual reality headset; a a device that mimics the chewing sounds transmitted from a diner's mouth to their ear drums; a cocktail glass with built-in sensors; a utensil that picks up on the diner's movements and integrates them into the virtual reality experience; and a 3-D printed food cube. Courtesy of Project Nourished hide caption

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Courtesy of Project Nourished

We Sampled The Gastronomic Frontier Of Virtual Reality

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Migrant workers harvest strawberries at a farm near Oxnard, Calif. Ventura County is one of two counties where labor organizers hope to get a Bill of Rights passed to protect farm workers from abuse and wage theft. Joe Klamar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Klamar/AFP/Getty Images

Clockwise from top left: French copper pate mold circa 1870, potato steamer c. 1950, poacher for turbot fish c. 1960, Earthenware tripiere pot c. 1920, terracotta toupin for simmering stews and soups from c. 1940. Courtesy of The Culinary Institute of America hide caption

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Courtesy of The Culinary Institute of America

Llapingacho is one of Marcella Kriebel's favorite recipes from her travels. It is an Ecuadorian cheese-stuffed potato pancake. Juxtaposed is causa, a Peruvian dish of layered potato, shrimp and avocado. Marcella Kriebel hide caption

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Marcella Kriebel

Harvesting oranges near Arcadia, Fla. The sacks that workers carry weigh about 90 pounds when they are full of fruit. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Guest Workers, Legal Yet Not Quite Free, Pick Florida's Oranges

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The Super Food Express bus travels to schools in Mobile County, Ala., to ensure children are fed healthy meals when school is out of session. The bus is part of the USDA's summer food program, which President Obama says needs additional funding. USDA/Flickr hide caption

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USDA/Flickr

The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and Department of Health advise against eating any fish from the Lower Passaic because it may be contaminated with toxic chemicals. But Owaldo Avad says he's been catching and consuming fish like these from the river for eight years. Sarah Gonzalez/WNYC hide caption

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Sarah Gonzalez/WNYC

New Jersey River Polluters Fund Toxic Fish Swap — But There's A Snag

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Loose-leaf green tea of the modern variety. Archaeologists have discovered ancient tea in the tomb of a Chinese emperor who died in 141 B.C. It's the oldest known physical evidence of tea. But scientists aren't sure if the emperor was drinking tea as we know it or using it as medicine. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Actress Sue Lyon eats a lollipop as Dolores "Lolita" Haze in a scene from Lolita, the 1962 film adaptation of Vladimir Nabokov's novel. Nabokov made sumptuous use of food in his writing, and the acoustic affinity between Lolita and lollipops is no coincidence. MGM Studios/Archive Photos/Getty Images hide caption

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MGM Studios/Archive Photos/Getty Images

Dole has voluntarily withdrawn from the market all of its Dole-branded and private label packaged salads processed at a Springfield, Ohio plant because the plant has been linked to a Listeria outbreak. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto