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Chef Michael Cimarusti, of Los Angeles' Providence restaurant, is pioneering the West Coast incarnation of Dock to Dish, a program that hooks up local fishermen directly with chefs. Courtesy of Providence hide caption

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Courtesy of Providence

LA's Top Restaurant Charts New Waters In Sustainable Seafood

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Imported from Europe, the custom of leaving gratuities began spreading in the U.S. post-Civil War. It was loathed as a master-serf custom that degraded America's democratic, anti-aristocratic ethic. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Internet Food Culture Gives Rise To New 'Eatymology'

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The Yocha Dehe tribe grows, mills and markets its own extra-virgin olive oil. The tribe's mill uses top-of-the-line equipment imported from Florence, Italy. Courtesy of Lisa Morehouse hide caption

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Courtesy of Lisa Morehouse

Native American Tribe Bets On Olive Oil

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How Do We Get To Love At 'First Bite'?

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Oranges ripen in a grove in Plant City, Fla. Citrus greening, a disease spread by a tiny insect that ruins oranges and eventually kills the trees, has put the future of the state's $10 billion citrus industry in doubt. Chris O'Meara/AP hide caption

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Chris O'Meara/AP

How Long Can Florida's Citrus Industry Survive?

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A view from the starting line of the sixth annual Krispy Kreme Challenge in Raleigh, N.C., in 2010. The local children's health clinic takes its name from this annual charity race, which draws about 8,000 participants each year. Courtesy of Dustin Bates hide caption

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Courtesy of Dustin Bates

Sweet Name Of Kids' Clinic Gives Some People Heartburn

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Swapping The Street For The Orchard, City Dwellers Take Their Pick Of Fruit

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A Tale Of Dread And Duck Breasts: One Chef's Nightmare, Retold

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The next time a cooking disaster strikes, remember: It happens to the best of us. Piotr Tomicki/iStockphoto hide caption

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Piotr Tomicki/iStockphoto

Kitchen Disasters: Top Chefs Recall Dinner Gone Wrong

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Scotch Whiskey Gets A Run For Its Money From Global Distillers

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Nancy Bruns, CEO of J.Q. Dickinson Salt-Works, gathers finished salt from an evaporation table in Malden, W.Va. Noah Adams for NPR hide caption

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Noah Adams for NPR

Fine Brine From Appalachia: The Fancy Mountain Salt That Chefs Prize

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