To get their summertime fix, sponge candy lovers on the shore of Lake Erie have to plan in advance. Melisa Goh/NPR hide caption

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Melisa Goh/NPR

In 'Sponge Candy Crescent,' Addicts Hoard 'Heaven'

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The Season Of Ice Cream: Tips From The Top

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This Chef Loves Her 'Pig,' From Nose To Tail

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Notice how some of these tomatoes have unripe-looking tops? Those "green shoulders" are actually the keys to flavor. pocius/Flickr.com hide caption

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pocius/Flickr.com

How The Taste Of Tomatoes Went Bad (And Kept On Going)

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James Beard award-winning chef Marcus Samuelsson has been a judge on Top Chef, Iron Chef America and Chopped. /Courtesy of Marcus Samuelsson hide caption

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/Courtesy of Marcus Samuelsson

Marcus Samuelsson: On Becoming A Top Chef

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Barbara and Norman Roux stand in front of cattle pens on their farm outside of Moundridge, Kan., where she has raised cattle for nearly 70 years. Peggy Lowe/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Peggy Lowe/Harvest Public Media

Unlike Chicken And Pork, Beef Still Begins With Small Family Ranches

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Some Americans are cutting back on red meat, and health concerns seem to be the biggest reason they're doing it, a survey found. Shmeliova Natalia/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Shmeliova Natalia/iStockphoto.com