Food Stories on food, nutrition, recipes, cooking, cookbook reviews, and health. Download Food and Hidden Kitchen podcasts and subscribe to RSS feeds.

John's Water Ice, A Philadelphia Institution

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/488150522/488150523" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

As the wild oyster population resurges, there is an added bonus — our waterways are getting cleaner. Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images

The Oyster's Mighty Comeback Is Creating Cleaner U.S. Waterways

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/488122810/488122811" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Salvage Supperclub hosts dinners in clean, tastefully decked out dumpsters. The menus highlight ingredients frequently tossed out by home cooks – think wilted basil or bruised plums — that could be put to tastier uses. Courtesy of Andrew Hinderaker hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Andrew Hinderaker

Cookie dough clings to the beaters of a standing mixer. The Food and Drug Administration is warning people not to eat raw dough due to an ongoing outbreak of illnesses linked to flour tainted with E. coli. Larry Crowe/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Larry Crowe/AP

A typical Native American oyster deposit, or midden, dating to about 1,000 years ago. Archaeologists are finding clues to sustainable oysters harvesting in these remains. Torben Rick/Smithsonian Institution hide caption

toggle caption
Torben Rick/Smithsonian Institution

Walrus, shown here on a drying rack, represents a major source of nutritious food for many in Alaska's St. Lawrence Island. In recent years, warmer temperatures have pushed the sea ice farther from St. Lawrence's shores, making walrus hunting more challenging. This shortfall has led to increased food insecurity on the island. Courtesy of Cara Durr hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Cara Durr

Forget Instagram. We've Been Showing Off Fancy Food For Centuries

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/487577888/487577889" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

More Than Just Saying 'Cheese,' Hundreds Sit Test To Become Official Experts

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/487522856/487522857" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Woohoo! Get wild, all ye Starbucks employees. Now crew necks are acceptable work wear! Starbucks hide caption

toggle caption
Starbucks

Starbucks' New Dress Code: Purple Hair And Fedoras OK, But Hoodies Forbidden

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/487365625/487522882" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Helen Gurley Brown in her office at Cosmopolitan magazine in the 1960s .The legendary editor, subject of two new biographies, knew sex sells – and food brings in ad money. She cannily combined them with features like "After Bed, What? (a light snack for an encore)." Santi Visalli/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Santi Visalli/Getty Images

"Nobody can soldier without coffee," a Union soldier wrote in 1865. (Above) Union soldiers sit with their coffee in tin cups, their hard-tack, and a kettle at their feet. Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection/Flickr The Commons hide caption

toggle caption
Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection/Flickr The Commons

If War Is Hell, Then Coffee Has Offered U.S. Soldiers Some Salvation

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/485227943/487303122" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Case Against The Shirley Temple (The Drink)

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/487264299/487264300" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript