Pie is the next cupcake. PIE IS THE NEW CUPCAKE. Spread the word. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Cupcakes Are Dead. Long Live The Pie!

Any way you slice it, trend-spotters are calling pie the food of the year. They've also predicted vegetables will push out meat for the starring role on dinner plates.

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Roasted pigs are displayed at a store in Manila, Philippines. Pork is considered lucky for the new year in Germany and other countries. Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Okryu-Gwan restaurant in Dubai is a rare import from North Korea. The restaurants serve as an important source of hard currency for Pyongyang. Other branches are in China, Nepal and Thailand. Peter Kenyon/NPR hide caption

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Stranahan's 1,000th barrel of whiskey awaits bottling. After six years, the company's entire output barely equals a day's production at one of the big whiskey makers. Megan Verlee/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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Cheers, Charles Dickens: In this illustration titled "Micawber in his element," Mr. Micawber makes punch after a dinner party thrown for him by David Copperfield. Charles Dickens, author of David Copperfield, was a punch aficionado. Fred Barnard/Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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At 75, French chef Jacques Pepin has spent the greater part of his life in a kitchen savoring food. Tom Hopkins hide caption

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Marcella and Victor Hazan in the kitchen of their home in Longboat Key, Fla. Laura Krantz/NPR hide caption

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Long View: Marcella Hazan Brings Italy To America

Marcella Hazan is credited with introducing Americans to true Italian cooking. But she began her career teaching science — and didn't have much of an interest in food.

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