A customer studies a display of milk and dairy products at Bryan's Grocery in San Francisco in March. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Chef Daniel O'Brien slices the pig ear terrine he made for the "Scary Bits" dinner at his Season Pantry supper club in Washington, D.C.

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Melissa Forsyth for NPR

Bobby Flay pictured with a cheeseburger

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Melanie Dunea

Food For Thought: Chefs Pick Their Last Meal On Earth

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A Thai worker prepares grubs to cook. Eating bugs is accepted throughout the world, but it is now being proposed as a healthy and environmentally friendly treat that's catching on in North America and Europe.

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Pornchai Kittiwongsakul/AFP/Getty Images

The 'Ick' Factor: Bugs Can Be Hard To Swallow

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Pythons' huge meals strengthen their hearts, and scientists hope it will help them learn how to treat human heart diseases.

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Gabriel Bouys/Getty Images/AFP

Eating Your Way To A Healthy Heart (If You're A Python)

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Would you remember exactly what was in this salad more than a week after eating it?

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Luciana Bueno Santos (LuBueno)/iStockphoto.com

Illinois farmers harvest corn crops near Monticello, Ill. An unseasonably hot summer likely damaged much of this year's corn crop, which means farmers may seek support through their crop insurance.

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Seth Perlman/AP

A photo from 2009 shows "All Natural" Necco Wafers. But after customers rejected the changes, the Massachusetts company returned to its original recipe.

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Charles Krupa/AP

Customer Outrage Forces Necco To Put Artificial Ingredients Back Into Wafers

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A customer holds up a spoon of deep-fried water bug in a restaurant in Thailand. Insects are a popular food in Thailand and many other countries around the world.

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Sakchai Lalit/ASSOCIATED PRESS