Currently, half of all products served in the school lunch program must be "whole-grain rich," which USDA defines as products made of at least 50 percent whole grain. According to the new standards, by the start of the next school year, schools must use only products that are whole-grain rich. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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A woman and her daughter shop at a Greenmarket in New York City using Electronic Benefits Transfer, or food stamps. Government data show that fewer people were receiving the benefits in February 2014 than at the peak in December 2012. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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Economic Upswing Has Fewer Americans Receiving Food Stamps
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Ching Ching Cheng painted each panel of her screen-printed Sriracha Hot Chili Sauces with a layer of the sauce, which changes color over time as it dries and ages. Courtesy of the Chinese American Museum hide caption

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John Stuart (left) of Green Man Brewery grabs a Tater Ridge mash sample from Sierra Nevada's Scott Jennings (center) at the Sierra Nevada brewery in Mills River, N.C. Courtesy of Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. hide caption

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Reverse Food Truck Caters To Hunger Relief Programs
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Sue Conley (left) and Peggy Smith, co-founders of Cowgirl Creamery, prepare their chilled leek and asparagus soup with creme fraiche and fresh ricotta at Cowgirl Creamery in Point Reyes Station, Calif. Tim Hussin for NPR hide caption

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Want Your Cheese To Age Gracefully? Cowgirl Creamery's Got Tips
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First lady Michelle Obama has been doing a lot of high-fiving with schoolchildren like these in Dallas to promote healthful lifestyles. Now she's diving more deeply into the politics of school lunch. LM Otero/AP hide caption

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First Lady Fights To Keep Healthful School Lunch Law Intact
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Kari Neumeyer feeds her dogs, Leo and Mia, a raw food diet supplemented by kibble, which she says is more natural than commercial dog food. Rob Eis/Courtesy of Kari Neumeyer hide caption

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A typical Russian kitchen inside an apartment built during the early 1960s, when Nikita Khrushchev led the Soviet Union — what later became known as Khrushchev apartments. Courtesy of The Kitchen Sisters hide caption

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How Soviet Kitchens Became Hotbeds Of Dissent And Culture
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