Sacks full of peanuts are displayed for sale at a market in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Aid groups say they are dismayed by a planned influx of American-grown peanuts from a U.S. agricultural surplus that they fear could undercut a vital cash crop in the impoverished Caribbean nation. Dieu Nalio Chery/AP hide caption

toggle caption Dieu Nalio Chery/AP

A billboard asks Ugandans to abstain from sex until marriage. The photo was taken in 2005 in Kampala. Per-Anders Pettersson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Per-Anders Pettersson/Getty Images
U.S. Spent $1.4 Billion To Stop HIV By Promoting Abstinence. Did It Work?
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/476601108/476639271" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Students from the Sekenani Girls Secondary School gather outside their dormitory after lunch. The new school is the first high school for girls in the Maasai region. Harriet Constable for NPR hide caption

toggle caption Harriet Constable for NPR

Countries in Latin America have a range of laws regarding abortion, from completely prohibited to no restrictions. Above: Women in Brazil (at left) demonstrate for abortion rights; a woman at a march in Paraguay (at right) holds a poster reading "If Abortion is Not Wrong, Then Nothing Is Wrong." Christophe Simon and Norberto Duarte/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Christophe Simon and Norberto Duarte/Getty Images
What's On This Year's Agenda The "Disease Detectives?"
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/476346674/476346675" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A young man from Bali, Indonesia, shows off his rainbow-colored rooster before a cockfight. Courtesy of Ruben Salgado Escudero and the World Photography Organization hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Ruben Salgado Escudero and the World Photography Organization

"I never imagined I would be in this position, doing this kind of work," says Raed Al Saleh, 33, of his job as the head of the Syrian Civil Defense. "But these are the circumstances." Courtesy of The Syria Campaign hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of The Syria Campaign

"You have to understand / that no one puts their children in a boat / unless the water is safer than land," wrote Warsan Shire in a poem about the refugee crisis. Courtesy of Amaal Said hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Amaal Said

Aissatou Sanogo and her late husband, Souleymane Diaby. Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR
She Told Her Husband She Didn't Want Him To Leave For Europe
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/475723019/475848938" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Dr. Forster Amponsah is one of two surgeons at the Koforidua Regional Hospital in Ghana. Trained in Cuba, he came home because he felt his skills were needed in Africa. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Jason Beaubien/NPR
The Improvisational Surgeon: Cardboard Casts, No Power, Patients Galore
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/475617180/475773301" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript