'High Highs And Deep Lows': 5 Days With Doctors Without Borders In South Sudan
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Morning at the MSF hospital compound in Bentiu, South Sudan. The two doctors, Jiske Steemsna (left) and Navpreet Sahsi, sit in front of the tents that serve as living quarters for the international workers during their three-to-six-month stints. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Embedded Podcast: The 'High Highs' And 'Deep Lows' At A Doctors Without Borders Hospital
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Margaret Chan (left), director general of the World Health Organization, is among the dignitaries visiting a military base in Conakry, Guinea, on a tour of west African countries affected by Ebola. Also pictured: Guinean President Alpha Conde (fourth from right) and U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon (right). BINANI/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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WHO Aims To Reform Itself But Health Experts Aren't Yet Impressed
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WHO Plans To Reshape Itself To Better Handle International Outbreaks
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Former White House Ebola Czar Urges Congress To Act Faster On Zika
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Flimsy straw shelters at the Assaga refugee camp house Nigerians and displaced people within Niger who have fled from Boko Haram raids. They say they are hungry and need more food aid. Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR hide caption

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Why Niger Is Having A Horrible Year
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A shop owner waits for customers in a market in the resort town of Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt. Over the past nine months, tourism has plummeted in the country after a series of deadly attacks. Chris McGrath/Getty Images hide caption

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People Aren't Coming To See The Pyramids Or Snorkel In The Red Sea
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Lariat Alhassan had lots of great paint to sell but no office where she could meet clients. And then she heard an ad on the radio that seemed too good to be true. Courtesy of Lariat Alhassan hide caption

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Her Paint Business Was Failing. Would A $65K Gift Save The Day?
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A member of Doctors Without Borders looks out over the general hospital in the Central African Republic's capital city, Bangui, in April 2014. Issouf Sanogo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Issues on the table at the World Humanitarian Summit range from conflict zones to refugees. Above, a herder moves his goats at the Dadaab refugee camp, created nearly 25 years ago. The Kenyan government now threatens to shut it down. Michelle Shephard/Toronto Star via Getty Images hide caption

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Aedes aegypti mosquito photographed through a microscope. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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CDC: 157 Pregnant Women In The U.S. Have Tested Positive For Zika
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