(From left) Mothers from Namibia's Himba tribe; from Amber, India; and from Washington state. Jose Luis Trisan/Getty; Hadynyah/Getty; Sarah Wolfe Photography/Getty hide caption

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Jose Luis Trisan/Getty; Hadynyah/Getty; Sarah Wolfe Photography/Getty

Secrets Of Breast-Feeding From Global Moms In The Know

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"If there's one thing I can promise you facts are not enough...I won't say they don't matter, but they're not enough. You need to connect with people on a basic level about things. And when you do that they respond." - Michael Specter TED/TED hide caption

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TED/TED

Michael Specter: What Happens When We Ignore Scientific Consensus?

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Matt Twombly for NPR

Spillover Beasts: Which Animals Pose The Biggest Viral Risk?

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"In college, I would tell my friends that I wanted to pursue a Ph.D., and they would chuckle and ridicule the idea," says Eqbal Dauqan, who is an assistant professor at the University Kebangsaan Malaysia at age 36. Born and raised in Yemen, Dauqan credits her "naughty" spirit for her success in a male-dominated culture. Sanjit Das for NPR hide caption

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Sanjit Das for NPR

A sometimes lethal strain of H7N9 bird flu that has infected about 1,500 people in China doesn't spread easily among humans — yet. But research published Thursday suggests just a few genetic mutations might be enough to make it quite contagious. Pasieka/Science Source hide caption

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Pasieka/Science Source

A Few Genetic Tweaks To Chinese Bird Flu Virus Could Fuel A Human Pandemic

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