Cellphones are everywhere in the developing world, as this Nairobi street scene shows. Bill and Melinda Gates believe the phones can be used for everything from farmer education to instant banking. Simon Maina/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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In November, women in El Salvador marched for the freedom of 17 women accused of abortion, including Carmen Guadalupe Vasquez Aldana. She was pardoned this week. Luis Galdamez/Xinhua /Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Luis Galdamez/Xinhua /Landov

Indian sand artist Sudersan Pattnaik touches up his sculpture for World No Tobacco Day at Golden Sea Beach in Puri, India. Asit Kumar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Six-year old Hadja Sow (left) and a classmate on their first day back at school after a prolonged break because of Ebola. Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR

Children with albinism, a genetic condition that can cause vision problems, study at a school for the blind in Tanzania. Because albinos are often attacked, the school is a rare sanctuary. Tony Karumba/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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This photo was taken in November, a tough month for Sierra Leone, with Ebola cases reportedly on the rise. A staff member is disinfecting an office where Dr. Komba Songu M'Briwah talks on the phone. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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A comic book captures the attention
 of Guinea worm patients Sadia Mesuna (right) and Fatawu Yakubu at a center for patients in Ghana. Louise Gubb/Courtesy of The Carter Center hide caption

itoggle caption Louise Gubb/Courtesy of The Carter Center

On a 2007 visit to Savelugu Hospital in Ghana, President Jimmy Carter asks a group of children if they've had Guinea worm. A raised hand is a yes. Louise Gubb/Courtesy of the Carter Center hide caption

itoggle caption Louise Gubb/Courtesy of the Carter Center

After the earthquake in 2010, about 1,000 people were living in tents on the median of Highway 2, one of Haiti's busiest roads. Five years later, tens of thousands of people in Port-au-Prince still live in tents and other temporary housing. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Protective gloves dry out at a treatment center for Ebola patients in Lunsar, Sierra Leone, about 60 miles from the capital of Freetown. Although the Ebola epidemic is leveling off, new cases are still being reported. Courtesy of Joel Selanikio hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Joel Selanikio