A child with nodding syndrome waits for treatment at an outreach site in Uganda's Pader district. Matthew Kielty for NPR hide caption

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Matthew Kielty for NPR

Scientists May Have Solved The Mystery Of Nodding Syndrome

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Once called the "Dutchmen" because of their large noses and large bellies, proboscis monkeys live only in Borneo. Ecosystems that have a lot of diverse animals, like this monkey, also tend to have a lot of diverse viruses. Charles Ryan hide caption

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Charles Ryan

Why Killer Viruses Are On The Rise

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Anchoveta are processed at a fish meal factory in Lima, Peru in 2009. Peru and Chile have the world's largest anchoveta fishery, making them the world's largest producers of fish for fishmeal. Ernesto Benavides/Getty Images hide caption

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Ernesto Benavides/Getty Images

A fall armyworm — actually a caterpillar — takes a bite out of corn and other crops. Jayne Crozier/Centre for Agriculture and Biosciences International hide caption

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Jayne Crozier/Centre for Agriculture and Biosciences International

It Came From The Americas — And It's Bad News For Africa

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Malnutrition Is Killing Nigeria's Children Because Of Food Shortage

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A woman farmers harvests pearl millet in Andhra Pradesh, India. Millets were once a steady part of Indians' diets until the Green Revolution, which encouraged farmers to grow wheat and rice. Now, the grains are slowly making a comeback. Courtesy of L.Vidyasagar hide caption

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Courtesy of L.Vidyasagar