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Matt Twombly for NPR

Probiotic Bacteria Could Protect Newborns From Deadly Infection

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Kamala stands in front of the hut where she sleeps when she has her period. She lives in western Nepal and was 14 when the photo was taken for an NPR story. She told us: "I'm afraid of snakes and men." Jane Greenhalgh/NPR hide caption

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Jane Greenhalgh/NPR

Likezo Nasilele and her husband, Chipopa Lyoni, with one of their four children in the courtyard of their home in rural Zambia. They were one of hundreds of families who received regular cash payouts as part of a government experiment. Nurith Aizenman/NPR hide caption

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Nurith Aizenman/NPR

Does Cash Aid Help The Poor — Or Encourage Laziness?

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Denis Otieno is one of the villagers getting $22 each month from the charity GiveDirectly. He and his wife have used some of the money to buy cypress saplings. They hope to sell the trees for lumber in a few years to pay for their children's education. Nichole Sobecki for NPR hide caption

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Nichole Sobecki for NPR

How To Fix Poverty: Why Not Just Give People Money?

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Samir Hussain was attacked in 2015 by a gang of strangers, one of whom threw drain cleaner on his face. Joanna Kakissis/NPR hide caption

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Joanna Kakissis/NPR

Acid Attacks On The Rise In The U.K.

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The so-called "goat plague" started out in the Ivory Coast and has spread as far as Mongolia, where goats (above) and sheep and antelopes and even camels are at risk. Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images

Preparing For A Nuclear Attack (Seriously)

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