A Novartis office in Mumbai, India. Divyakant Solanki /EPA /LANDOV hide caption

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Patent Ruling In India Could Boost Exports Of Cheap Medicine To Third World

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Dr. Nayna Patel performs an ultrasound exam on Rinku Macwan, at a hospital near Ahmedabad, India. It's illegal in India for doctors to reveal a baby's sex during these exams, but many do it anyway. Sam Panthaky/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Amid Syria's Crisis, Mental Health Care For Refugees

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A young boy plays on a commode during an event for World Toilet Day in New Delhi in November. An estimated 131 million Indian homes don't have a latrine or a clean toilet. Raveendran/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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About a third of the world's population is thought to be infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but only a small fraction of people get the disease. NIAID_Flickr hide caption

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An electron micrograph of HIV particles infecting a human T cell. French researchers say they've found 14 patients with so little HIV virus in their blood that the patients have gone into "long-term remission." National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases hide caption

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The city of Sao Paolo, Brazil, shot with a fisheye lens. Standards of living are improving not just in the big developing nations like Brazil, but also in smaller countries such as Bangladesh and Ghana. Daniel Incandela/Flickr via Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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If you catch dengue fever in the Western Hemisphere, it most likely came from the Aedes aegypti mosquito. Muhammad Mahdi Karim /Wikimedia.org hide caption

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A Palestinian dialysis patient is treated at the Shifa hospital in Gaza City in 2010. Many kidney patients in Gaza struggle to get proper dialysis therapy because machines are often overbooked. Khalil Hamra/AP hide caption

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Can Kidney Transplants Ease Strain On Gaza's Health System?

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A road leading back to the Togawas' old home in the seaside village of Namie is closed due to radioactive contamination. Geoff Brumfiel/NPR hide caption

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Depression And Anxiety Could Be Fukushima's Lasting Legacy

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Although tuberculosis is declining around the world, drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are on the rise. NIAID/Flickr.com hide caption

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What The Case Of A Mississippi Child Can Tell HIV Researchers

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The U.S. ranks first in the world at stopping brain cancers, epidemiologists reported Monday. Here neurosurgeon Dr. Roger Hudgins and his assistant, Holly Zeller of Akron, Ohio, look at an MRI scan before performing surgery to remove a brain tumor. Mike Cardew/MCT /Landov hide caption

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