Grace Aber stands in the shade of a mango tree with her children in the remote village of Tumangu in northern Uganda. Four of Aber's nine children have been diagnosed with nodding syndrome, starting with Partick (front), who first showed symptoms in 2002. Matthew Kielty for NPR hide caption

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After Years Of War, Ugandan Children Face New Deadly Threat

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A nurse walks towards the Roger Salengro Hospital in Lille, France, where two patients were diagnosed with a coronavirus related to SARS. Michel Spingler/AP hide caption

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The baobob fruit is one of the 100 traditional African food crops that a group of scientists want to learn more about to improve nutrition. Alexander Joe/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A baby receives a polio vaccine at the Medina Maternal Child Health center in Mogadishu, Somalia. The country has one of the lowest immunization rates in the world. Ben Curtis/AP hide caption

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A man smokes a cigarette as he takes a break at a fruit market in Hyderabad, India. Smoking tobacco is eight times more prevalent among Indian men than women. Noah Seelam/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniele Coelho holds her newborn daughter as doctors finish her cesarean section at the Perinatal Clinic in Rio de Janeiro on Aug. 2. Brazil has one of the world's highest rates of cesarean births. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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C-Sections Deliver Cachet For Wealthy Brazilian Women

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More than a hundred different species of Anopheles mosquitoes can transmit malaria to people. Adam Cole/NPR hide caption

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There's no better deal than getting polio cases down to zero, philanthropist Bill Gates says. Marie McGrory/NPR hide caption

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Why Bill Gates Thinks Ending Polio Is Worth It

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A woman wearing a mask rides past a KFC restaurant in Shanghai last month. Food scares and the bird flu haven't stopped many chicken lovers in the city from visiting KFC and other restaurants. Aly Song/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Rat 'Mutton' And Bird Flu: Strange Days For Meat Eaters In Shanghai

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Scientists in the U.S. are growing the H7N9 virus in the laboratory to help with vaccine development. James Gathany/CDC/Douglas E. Jordan hide caption

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Officials Prepare For Another Flu Pandemic — Just In Case

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