The bite of a cobra can paralyze its victims and, if enough venom is released, fatally stop their breathing. It's estimated that more than 75 percent of patients in India who die from a snake's bite never make it to the hospital. STRDEL/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ali Maow Maalin said he avoided getting the smallpox vaccine as a young man because he was afraid of needles. He didn't want others to make the same mistake with polio. Courtesy of the World Health Organization hide caption

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MERS Virus Update
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A midwife holds a newborn at Rabia Balkhi Women's Hospital in Kabul, Afghanistan. Jonathan Saruk/International Medical Corps hide caption

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Listen to midwife Emily Slocum describe delivering babies in the dark, with no running water.
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A mother and daughter walk home after attending a community meeting about eradicating female genital mutilation in the western Senegalese village of Diabougo. Finbarr O'Reilly/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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A Yemeni child receives a polio vaccine in the capital city of Sanaa. The Yemen government launched an immunization campaign last month in response to the polio outbreak in neighboring Somalia. Mohammed Huwais/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Polio Eradication Suffers A Setback As Somali Outbreak Worsens
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Vaccines against the HPV virus are already used to prevent cervical and anal cancer. Harry Cabluck/AP hide caption

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Children with tuberculosis sleep outside at Springfield House Open Air School in London in 1932. Like sanatoriums, these schools offered TB sufferers a place to receive the top treatment of the day: fresh air and sunshine. Fox Photos/Getty Images hide caption

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Pandoraviruses were discovered lurking in the mud of Chile and Australia, half a world apart. courtesy of Chantal Abergel and Jean-Michel Claverie hide caption

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World's Biggest Virus May Have Ancient Roots
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A Doctors Without Borders support counselor waits for MDR-TB patients at a clinic in Nukus, Uzbekistan. Courtesy of Misha Friedman hide caption

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Dale Hippensteel, manages the Sheboygan County health department. Jeffrey Phelps/For NPR hide caption

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Tuberculosis Outbreak Shakes Wisconsin City
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People living in affluent neighborhoods in north central Dallas were most likely to get infected in 2012. Those neighborhoods were also hit hardest in the 2006 outbreak. JAMA hide caption

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Red blood cells are normally shaped like doughnuts, but sickle cells (purple) are flattened and clump together. NIH hide caption

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Sickle Cell Anemia Is On The Rise Worldwide
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A woman waits to get AIDS drugs on April 8 at a clinic in Ga-Rankuwa, South Africa, about 55 miles north of Johannesburg. New WHO guidelines say patients should start HIV treatment much earlier, before they become extremely sick. Stephane de Sakutin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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South Africa Weighs Starting HIV Drug Treatment Sooner
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