Two women check their cellphones as they hawk their wares on a bridge over the Artibonite River, whose waters are believed to be the source of Haiti's 2010 cholera outbreak. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Cellphones Could Help Doctors Stay Ahead Of An Epidemic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/140065855/140079567" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Remnant From Algae In Malaria Parasite May Prove Its Weakness

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/140069350/140079497" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Desperation Grips Children In Horn Of Africa

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/139969318/139969309" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Researchers hope to keep the mosquito that transmits dengue, Aedes aegypti, from infecting humans using the Wolbachia bacterium. James Gathany/CDC Public Health Image Library hide caption

toggle caption James Gathany/CDC Public Health Image Library

Better You Than Me: Scientists Sicken Mosquitoes To Stop Dengue

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/139925486/139934234" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Pakistani NGO workers protest at a rally on World AIDS Day in Peshawar in 2006. Tariq Mahmood/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Tariq Mahmood/AFP/Getty Images

Women hold mosquito nets after receiving them at a distribution point in Sesheke, Zambia. Researchers say malaria may have rebounded in some parts of Zambia and Senegal because of resistance to the insecticide-treated nets. ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

toggle caption ASSOCIATED PRESS

A vendor sells betel leaf wrapped in silver foil in Lucknow, India. AJAY KUMAR SINGH/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

toggle caption AJAY KUMAR SINGH/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Listen to Corey Flintoff's Story

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/139534768/139666542" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Feeding A Hotter, More Crowded Planet

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/139579616/139579605" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Although various types of contraceptive methods are available in Nigeria, about 20 percent of women say they're not able to access them. Sometimes their husbands stand in the way. GEORGE OSODI/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

toggle caption GEORGE OSODI/ASSOCIATED PRESS