Pig farm workers push live pigs into a large grave in Nipah in 1999. To stop the outbreak, the Malaysian government culled almost 1 million pigs, nearly destroying the country's pork industry. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP

A Taste For Pork Helped A Deadly Virus Jump To Humans

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Lucia Adeng Wek holds her 3-year-old son, Wek Wol Wek, who suffers from malnutrition. They're at a clinic in South Sudan run by Doctors without Borders and were photographed on October 11, 2016. Albert Gonzalez Farran/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Albert Gonzalez Farran/AFP/Getty Images

Who Declares A Famine? And What Does That Actually Mean?

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Each year thousands of people from around the world tour the Gomantong Cave in Borneo. Although scientists have found a potentially dangerous virus in bats that roost in the cave, no one has ever gotten sick from a trip here. Razis Nasri hide caption

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Razis Nasri

The Next Pandemic Could Be Dripping On Your Head

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Sundaygar Moses, now 12, was suffered a gunshot wound as an infant. Due to an infection, his right leg had to be amputated beneath the knee. His new prosthetic is a close match to his skin tone. Carielle Doe for NPR hide caption

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Carielle Doe for NPR

A child with nodding syndrome waits for treatment at an outreach site in Uganda's Pader district. Matthew Kielty for NPR hide caption

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Matthew Kielty for NPR

Scientists May Have Solved The Mystery Of Nodding Syndrome

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Once called the "Dutchmen" because of their large noses and large bellies, proboscis monkeys live only in Borneo. Ecosystems that have a lot of diverse animals, like this monkey, also tend to have a lot of diverse viruses. Charles Ryan hide caption

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Charles Ryan

Why Killer Viruses Are On The Rise

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A fall armyworm — actually a caterpillar — takes a bite out of corn and other crops. Jayne Crozier/Centre for Agriculture and Biosciences International hide caption

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Jayne Crozier/Centre for Agriculture and Biosciences International

It Came From The Americas — And It's Bad News For Africa

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Mourners carry the coffin of one of six Afghan employees of the Red Cross killed in an attack this week in a remote northern province. Farshad Usyan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Farshad Usyan/AFP/Getty Images