A small island sits in the middle of Kangeq's old harbor. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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The Arctic Suicides: It's Not The Dark That Kills You
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American actress Angelina Jolie speaks at a conference for the prevention of sexual violence in conflict, at the Dom Armije in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, in 2014. Ismail Duru/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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The mystery disease in South Sudan has not been identified but is known to cause fever and unexplained bleeding. Above: an image of another hemorrhagic fever, Marburg virus, made with an electron microscope and then colorized. BSIP/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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Majd kept a journal about a time in her life when she was torn between getting married or going to school. Courtesy of Madj hide caption

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Diary Of A Saudi Girl: Karate Lover, Science Nerd ... Bride?
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Rwanda is known as "le pays des milles collines" €-- the land of a thousand hills. Weather varies by altitude; for farmers, detailed forecasts can make a huge difference. Francesco Fiondella/International Research Institute for Climate and Society hide caption

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Turns Out You Do Need A Weatherman To Know Which Way The Wind Blew
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Margaret Chan (left), director general of the World Health Organization, is among the dignitaries visiting a military base in Conakry, Guinea, on a tour of west African countries affected by Ebola. Also pictured: Guinean President Alpha Conde (fourth from right) and U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon (right). BINANI/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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WHO Aims To Reform Itself But Health Experts Aren't Yet Impressed
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Flimsy straw shelters at the Assaga refugee camp house Nigerians and displaced people within Niger who have fled from Boko Haram raids. They say they are hungry and need more food aid. Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR hide caption

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Why Niger Is Having A Horrible Year
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A shop owner waits for customers in a market in the resort town of Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt. Over the past nine months, tourism has plummeted in the country after a series of deadly attacks. Chris McGrath/Getty Images hide caption

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People Aren't Coming To See The Pyramids Or Snorkel In The Red Sea
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Lariat Alhassan had lots of great paint to sell but no office where she could meet clients. And then she heard an ad on the radio that seemed too good to be true. Courtesy of Lariat Alhassan hide caption

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Her Paint Business Was Failing. Would A $65K Gift Save The Day?
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Issues on the table at the World Humanitarian Summit range from conflict zones to refugees. Above, a herder moves his goats at the Dadaab refugee camp, created nearly 25 years ago. The Kenyan government now threatens to shut it down. Michelle Shephard/Toronto Star via Getty Images hide caption

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A drone takes a practice flight in Virginia with medical supplies — part of a project to evaluate the flying machines for use in humanitarian crises. Pete Marovich/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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