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STORIES OF LIFE IN A CHANGING WORLD

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A police officer guards the home of a family under a 21-day Ebola quarantine in Freetown, Sierra Leone, back in March. Michael Duff/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Michael Duff/AP

A dangerous nuzzle? A man in western Abu Dhabi hugs a camel brought in from Saudi Arabia for beauty contests. Middle East respiratory syndrome circulates in camels across the Arabian Peninsula. Dave Yoder/National Geographic hide caption

itoggle caption Dave Yoder/National Geographic

Raymond Wang, 17, of Vancouver, celebrates winning first place at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair in Pittsburgh, May 15. Courtesy of Kathy Wolfe/Intel hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Kathy Wolfe/Intel

A woman on a street in Seoul checks her cellphone. The government is ramping up efforts to control an outbreak of the Middle East respiratory syndrome by monitoring the smartphones of those under quarantine. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images

A woman smokes a cigarette in a Beijing shopping market, even though the practice is now banned inside public spaces. Kevin Frayer/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

In front of the emergency room at the Samsung Medical Center in Seoul, medical workers care for a man suspected of having the Middle Respiratory syndrome on Monday. Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images

Primal posture: Ubong tribesmen in Borneo (right) display the perfect J-shaped spines. A woman in Burkina Faso (left) holds her baby so that his spine stays straight. The center image shows the S-shaped spine drawn in a modern anatomy book (Fig. I) and the J-shaped spine (Fig. II) drawn in the 1897 anatomy book Traite d'Anatomie Humaine. Courtesy of Esther Gokhale and Ian Mackenzie/Nomads of the Dawn hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Esther Gokhale and Ian Mackenzie/Nomads of the Dawn

South Korean school students put on face masks during a special class on the MERS virus at an elementary school in Seoul. Jung Yeon-je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Jung Yeon-je/AFP/Getty Images

Patient one: A businessman brought the Middle East respiratory syndrome to South Korea in early May. Since then, he has likely spread the virus to more than 20 other people. Several of those have passed the virus onto others. Maia Majumder/Health Map hide caption

itoggle caption Maia Majumder/Health Map

A student wearing a face mask stands in a public square in Seoul on June 3. More than 200 primary schools shut down as South Korea has struggled to contain an outbreak of the MERS virus. ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images

Since the first case on May 20, confirmed cases of Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS, have swelled to at least 30 in South Korea. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

A South Korean walks through a market in Seoul wearing a mask. South Korean President Park Geun-Hye scolded health officials over their "insufficient" response to an outbreak of the MERS virus. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images