A man and his drone: Carlos Casteneda of the Amazon Basin Conservation Association prepares to launch one of his plastic foam planes. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Eyes In The Sky: Foam Drones Keep Watch On Rain Forest Trees

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Monique Yusizanna Ouz, 66, is going to have electricity for the first time in her life. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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She's 66 And Finally Getting Electricity. Bring On The Ice Cream!

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It's a drone delivery! This copter is ferrying medicine from a pharmacy to the headquarters of Deutsche Post in Bonn, Germany, part of a test of drone capabilities. Andreas Rentz/Getty Images hide caption

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Safe and small: The credit-card-sized test for anthrax destroys the deadly bacteria after the test completes. Courtesy of Sandia Nation hide caption

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Safer Anthrax Test Aims To Keep The Bioweapon From Terrorists

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Astrophysicist Szabolcs Marka has a radical idea: Use light as a barrier between mosquitoes and humans. He was awarded a $100,000 Grand Challenge grant by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to see if the idea really works. Courtesy of the Gates Foundation hide caption

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Solar sponge: The top layer of graphite soaks up the sun's energy in tiny holes. When drops of liquid fill the holes, the water quickly evaporates. (The beaker looks hot, but the water below the sponge is cool as a cucumber.) Courtesy of George Ni/MIT hide caption

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All folded up and ready to magnify: The Foldscope weighs less than two nickels, is small enough to fit in your back pocket and offers more than 2,000-fold magnification. TED/YouTube hide caption

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A $1 Microscope Folds From Paper With A Drop Of Glue

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Clear and clean, bubble wrap is well-suited to serve as an array of tiny test tubes. Here a dye solution is injected into the bubbles to measure the hemoglobin concentration in blood. American Chemical Society hide caption

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