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STORIES OF LIFE IN A CHANGING WORLD

A grandmother and her grandson sit on the belongings that they have salvaged from their collapsed homes on April 29, 2015 in Bhaktapur, Nepal. Omar Havana/Getty Images hide caption

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Money

Show Us The Aid: Anger In An Ancient Nepali Town

Earthquake victims in Bhaktapur need food, water and shelter. They assert that the government is not delivering.

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A woman cultivates seaweed off the coast of Madagascar to counter overfishing. She's working with Blue Ventures, a business that supports its conservation projects by giving ecotours. Courtesy of Skoll Foundation hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Skoll Foundation

In the 1950s, the World Bank funded the creation of the world's largest man-made dam, the Kariba Dam, which sits on the border of Zimbabwe and Zambia. The construction of such dams can have dire consequences for poor people living near a river, an investigation found. Jekesai Njikizana/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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As China continues its massive economic growth, especially in cities, the government continues to severely limit people's rights. Is that system sustainable? Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

The Liberia-Guinea border has been closed since the early days of the Ebola outbreak. The Liberian city of Ganta — about a mile from the border — has historically been a hub of commerce, and was hit hard by the closure. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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Mrs. Mama Quaye has run Mrs. Quayes African Food Center on Ashmun St. in downtown Monrovia for over 20 years. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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Each item, including boots from Guatemala, a basket from Rwanda and a soda can cuff from Kenya, are handmade. And when people buy these gifts, the profits go back to the artisans and their community. Courtesy of Teysha; Indego Africa; Serrv hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Teysha; Indego Africa; Serrv

Saah Exco was found alone on a beach in Liberia's West Point slum, naked and abandoned and likely an Ebola victim.Research suggests the story of one needy individual motivates charitable donors more than statistics about millions of sufferers. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

Farmer Issiaka Ouedraogo lays cocoa beans out to dry on reed mats, on a farm outside the village of Fangolo, Ivory Coast. Rebecca Blackwell/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Rebecca Blackwell/AP

Yoram Bauman jokes about "hyperinflation in hell" and on earth. Case in point: the Zimbabwe hundred-trillion-dollar note. Lejia Lombardi/Courtesy of Inter-American Development Bank hide caption

itoggle caption Lejia Lombardi/Courtesy of Inter-American Development Bank

Port Louis is the capital of Mauritius, known as the "Switzerland of Africa" because of its wealth and its mountains. The country has banned visitors from Ebola-stricken nations. Paul Russell/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Paul Russell/Corbis

John Mayer sings to tens of thousands at the 2013 Global Citizen Festival in Central Park. The event is part of an effort to end extreme poverty. Stephen Lovekin/Getty Images hide caption

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To protect its cocoa workers from Ebola, the Ivory Coast has closed its borders. Ange Aboa/Reuters/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Ange Aboa/Reuters/Corbis