A girl in a park in Managua, Nicaragua. The country topped the list for gains in happiness. Nicolas Garcia/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Nicolas Garcia/AFP/Getty Images

Global Ranking Of Happiness Has Happy News For Norway And Nicaragua

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/520859626/520862794" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Marjan practices at the Afghanistan National Institute of Music in Kabul. Rachel Corner/De Beeldunie hide caption

toggle caption
Rachel Corner/De Beeldunie

All-Female Orchestra From Afghanistan Is A Force For Change

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/512592727/512592728" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Khaleed Khateeb, 21, was the videographer for the Netflix documentary The White Helmets. "This photo was after double tap of aircraft on July 27, 2014," he says, referring to an airstrike followed by another attack. "I don't know how I survived." Fadi al Halabi/Courtesy of Khaleed Khateeb hide caption

toggle caption
Fadi al Halabi/Courtesy of Khaleed Khateeb

Clockwise from upper left: Dr. Forster Amponsah; a Malick Sidbe photo taken in Mali; a global garden of radio; Chewa the TB-sniffing rat; another Sidbe photo; Olympic medalist Fu Yuanhui of China; the New Mexico cave where a superhero bacterium lived; poverty fighter Sir Fazle Hasan Abed; calligrapher Sughra Hussainy; activist Loyce Maturu. Jason Beaubien/NPR, Courtesy of Malick Sidibe and Jack Shainman Gallery, Katherine Streeter for NPR, Maarten Boersema/APOPO, Gabriel Bouys/AFP/Getty Images, Courtesy of Max Wisshak, Courtesy of BRAC, Ben de la Cruz and Toya Sarno Jordan/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jason Beaubien/NPR, Courtesy of Malick Sidibe and Jack Shainman Gallery, Katherine Streeter for NPR, Maarten Boersema/APOPO, Gabriel Bouys/AFP/Getty Images, Courtesy of Max Wisshak, Courtesy of BRAC, Ben de la Cruz and Toya Sarno Jordan/NPR

The singer Alsarah: "Sudanese people said I wasn't Sudanese enough. Arabs said I wasn't an Arab. Americans said I wasn't American. I used to be like, 'I don't belong anywhere! Now I'm like you're all mine. All my countries, you're all mine." Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ryan Kellman/NPR