Ships transporting containers like these at the Port of Tacoma, Washington, last year carry the goods at issue in the TPP deal. A new report says the trade pact would boost the U.S. economy, but only by a modest amount. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel speaks at the 84th winter meeting of the U.S. Conference of Mayors in January in Washington, D.C. Mandel Ngan /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Supporters of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump shout at the media prior to a rally at the Charleston Civic Center on May 5 in Charleston, W.Va. Mark Lyons/Getty Images hide caption

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It's Gotten A Lot Harder To Act Like Whiteness Doesn't Shape Our Politics
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White House Sends Schools Guidance On Transgender Access To Bathrooms
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Factories have been closing in southwest Ohio for years. This Delphi factory in Dayton shut down in 2006. Economists say that to a large degree, the decline in middle incomes reflects the loss of factory jobs. J.D. Pooley/Getty Images hide caption

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Cattle rancher Mike John runs a cow-calf operation in Huntsville, Mo., and says he hopes the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal will open up new markets for his beef. Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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U.S. Navy air wing captains pause on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt last September. Every day, the steam-powered catapult aboard this massive ship flings American fighter jets into the sky, on missions to target the extremist Islamic State group in Iraq and Syria. Marko Drobnjakovic/AP hide caption

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Mark Rosekind, administrator of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, speaks Wednesday during a news conference on Takata air bags in Washington, D.C. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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DOT Announces Recall Of Up To 40 Million More Takata Air Bag Inflators
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Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders waves to the crowd after arriving Tuesday at a campaign rally at the Big Four Lawn Park in Louisville, Ky. John Sommers II/Getty Images hide caption

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Bernie Sanders Says He's Staying In And It's 'Good For The Democratic Party'
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Former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell speaks outside the Supreme Court in Washington on Wednesday after the justices heard oral arguments on the corruption case against him. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Supreme Court May Be Leaning Toward Voiding Ex-Va. Governor's Corruption Conviction
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A container ship is unloaded at the Port of Los Angeles. Voters in this year's presidential election have deep feelings about trade — and often are at odds with each other about it. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A Nation Engaged: Trade Stirs Up Sharp Debate In This Election Cycle
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The U.S. Justice Department has again found a way to access a locked iPhone without Apple's help, so investigators can access data involved in a court case. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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