Republican New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie speaks with reporters in Trenton, N.J., this month. Christie was not invited to this year's CPAC conference. Mel Evans/AP hide caption

toggle caption Mel Evans/AP

Under sequestration, federal agencies don't have the flexibility to choose to spare popular programs or services by making administrative cuts elsewhere. Tatiana Popova /iStockphoto.com hide caption

toggle caption Tatiana Popova /iStockphoto.com

Rep. Adam Kinzinger, R-Ill., is among those Republicans the conservative Club for Growth is looking to "primary" in 2014. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

toggle caption Susan Walsh/AP

Children eat breakfast at a federally funded Head Start program. Many Head Start administrators are concerned they may have to cut back on the number of enrolled children if the sequester moves ahead. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption John Moore/Getty Images

Sequester Spells Uncertainty For Many Public Schools

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/173058287/173086597" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg speaks to the media outside the White House after meeting with Vice President Joe Biden on Wednesday to discuss the administration's proposals to reduce gun violence. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Drew Angerer/Getty Images

President Obama speaks Tuesday about the sequester in Newport News, Va. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

toggle caption Steve Helber/AP

Feb. 27 Junkie segment on TOTN

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/173069961/173069952" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Shipyard workers wait for President Obama to speak about looming automatic federal budget cuts Tuesday in Newport News, Va. Charles Dharapak/AP hide caption

toggle caption Charles Dharapak/AP

The Scramble Over The Sequester Showdown

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/172892268/172892915" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg's gun control superPAC has poured more than $2 million into a Democratic primary in Chicago for a U.S. House seat. Brendan McDermid/Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption Brendan McDermid/Reuters/Landov