This Lawson convenience store in Kowaguchi, Japan, sells a selection of prepared meals and fresh vegetables and meats, along with products aimed at the elderly. Many of the store's older customers find it hard to get to the supermarket, the store's manager says. Ina Jaffe/NPR hide caption

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Beyond Slurpees: Many Japanese Mini-Marts Now Cater To Elders

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A Miami-Dade County mosquito control worker sprays around a school in the Wynwood area of Miami earlier this month. Alan Diaz/AP hide caption

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Miami Schools Take Steps To Protect Returning Students From Zika

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Nicole Xu for NPR

A Small Town Struggles With A Boom In Sober Living Homes

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The 'Young Invincibles': A Huge Hurdle For Obamacare

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How Japan Is Dealing With Impacts Of Supporting The Oldest Population In The World

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Lydia Joy Ziel, whose crib is pictured here, was diagnosed with a serious disease while still in the womb. Miscarriage and stillbirth are common, but often parents feel they're walking through the experience alone. A trained group called Baby Loss Family Advisors seeks to help. Stina Sieg hide caption

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For Parents Who Have Lost A Baby, Some Help With Their Grief

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Abraham Vidaurre, 12, checks his arm after receiving an HPV shot in Corpus Christi, Texas. The vaccine is recommended for 11- and 12-year-old boys and girls. Matthew Busch/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Alina Nurieva (right) sat with Gabriela Cisneros, an insurance agent from Sunshine Life and Health Advisors, and picked an insurance plan at the Mall of the Americas in Miami last November. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Bertolini, CEO of Aetna, told the Justice Department in July that the insurer would walk away from many health exchanges if the government opposed the company's proposed deal for Humana. On Tuesday, Aetna followed through. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Hearing Officer Jim Teal presides over a session of Early Intervention Family Drug Court in Sacramento, Calif., in March. The county program helps keep families together — and saves taxpayers $7 million annually, Sacramento County officials say. Robert Durell for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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California Court Helps Kids By Healing Parents' Addictions

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Aetna is the latest big health insurer to retreat from the exchanges established under the Affordable Care Act. Jessica Hill/AP hide caption

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Aetna Joins Other Major Insurers In Pulling Back From Obamacare

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Health insurance plans may exclude coverage for many types of genetic testing that aren't required by law. Andrew Brookes/Getty Images hide caption

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Express Scripts assures patients it has a policy of not putting cancer medicine or mental health drugs on the list of products it excludes from its formulary. Fuse/Getty Images hide caption

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Will Your Prescription Meds Be Covered Next Year? Better Check!

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Katherine Du for NPR

Where Lead Lurks And Why Even Small Amounts Matter

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Bad data in means bad data out. Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Social Security Data Errors Can Turn People Into The Living Dead

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