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Meg Ivatti (right), a manager at HealthSource RI, the state's insurance exchange, works with Dianiri Paulino to help a caller sign up for coverage in 2014. Stephan Savoia/AP hide caption

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Stephan Savoia/AP

For Rhode Island, Interstate Health Insurance Sales Didn't Pan Out

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As Republicans look for ways to loosen the Affordable Care Act's coverage requirements, sales of short-term health insurance policies could take off. Petrol/Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Petrol/Westend61/Getty Images

HealthCare.gov's open enrollment for 2017 started Nov. 1 and ends on Tuesday. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Last Chance To Sign Up For Obamacare, For 2017 And Maybe Forever

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Caiaimage/Sam Edwards/Getty Images

Doctor Considers The Pitfalls Of Extending Life And Prolonging Death

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Physical therapy may not help a person with a progressive chronic disease become well, but it can help slow a decline. Hero Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Hero Images/Getty Images

Medicaid doesn't just provide health care for the poor; it also pays for long-term care for a lot of older people, including the majority of nursing home residents. Repealing the ACA could change the way Medicaid programs are funded. Bill Gallery/Doctor Stock/Science Faction/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Gallery/Doctor Stock/Science Faction/Getty Images

Obamacare Repeal Could Threaten Provisions That Help Older Adults

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Peter Lee, executive director of Covered California, speaks during an enrollment event in Grand Park, in front of Los Angeles City Hall, on Nov. 14. Gary Friedman/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Friedman/LA Times via Getty Images

With financial incentives from the ACA, the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston signed agreements with physicians and insurers to create an accountable care organization, in hopes of reducing health care's cost in the long run. But achieving those savings takes time, say hospital officials. Elise Amendola/AP hide caption

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Elise Amendola/AP

Hospitals Worry Repeal Of Obamacare Would Jeopardize Innovations In Care

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Republicans Consider Plans To Replace Obamacare In Philadelphia

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Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., accompanied by Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, announces the Patient Freedom Act of 2017, one of several GOP plans to replace the Affordable Care Act. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Republicans Have Plans To Replace Obamacare — Now They Need To Agree On One

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GOP Lawmakers Look To Shape Health Care Strategy At Philadelphia Retreat

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Annette Schiller of Palm Desert, Calif., who was 94 and diagnosed with terminal thyroid and breast cancer, had trouble finding doctors to help her end her life under California's new aid-in-dying law. Tana Yurivilca/Courtesy of Linda Fitzgerald hide caption

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Tana Yurivilca/Courtesy of Linda Fitzgerald

A vial of injectable steroids from the New England Compounding Center seen at the Tennessee Department of Health in Nashville in 2012. Kristin M. Hall/AP hide caption

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Kristin M. Hall/AP

Victims Of Contaminated Steroids Still Hurting: 'My Life's Upside-Down'

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