Amanda McMacken, a registered nurse at Temple University Hospital, shows North Philadelphia residents how to slow bleeding in trauma victims. Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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In Philadelphia, Neighbors Learn How To Keep Shooting Victims Alive

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What did she say? Eniko Kubinyi/Science hide caption

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Their Masters' Voices: Dogs Understand Tone And Meaning Of Words

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After a Cologuard screening test for colon cancer comes back positive, patients may have to pay for additional diagnostic tests. Exact Sciences hide caption

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Bacteriophages, in red, look like tiny aliens, with big heads and skinny bodies. They use their "legs" to stick to and infect a bacterial cell, in blue. Biophoto Associates/Science Source hide caption

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Your Gut's Gone Viral, And That Might Be Good For Your Health

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Mylan, the maker of EpiPen, says it will sell a generic version for $300 for a two-pack, a price that consumer advocates say is still too high. The device is used to treat severe allergic reactions. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Maker Of EpiPen To Sell Generic Version For Half The Price

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Careful audits of a representative sampling of bills from 37 Medicare Advantage Programs in 2007 have revealed some consistent patterns in the way they overbill, a Center for Public Integrity investigation finds. Nick Shepherd/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Brookes/Getty Images

A New Course At Arkansas Colleges: How To Not Get Pregnant

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The FDA says that facilities that collect blood donations throughout the United States should be testing donations for Zika within 12 weeks. Toby Talbot/AP hide caption

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All U.S. Blood Donations Should Be Screened For Zika, FDA Says

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Lenroy Watt talks with residents of Miami's Little Haiti about Zika, leaving brochures in Creole about how to prevent the illness, as well as phone numbers for local mosquito control agencies and the county health department. Courtesy of Planned Parenthood hide caption

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Planned Parenthood Joins Campaign To Rid Miami Neighborhoods Of Zika

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A project now under construction in Cleveland will eventually house the Case Western Reserve University's medical, dental and nursing schools, as well as the Cleveland Clinic's in-house medical school. Courtesy of Cleveland Clinic hide caption

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Teaching Medical Teamwork Right From The Start

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The cost of an EpiPen two-pack has risen more than 400 percent in recent years. The drug is used to halt severe allergic reactions. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Discounts Aren't Enough to Halt Outrage At High EpiPen Prices

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These pills were made to look like Oxycodone, but they're actually an illicit form of the potent painkiller fentanyl. A surge in police seizures of illicit fentanyl parallels a rise in overdose deaths. Tommy Farmer/Tennessee Bureau of Investigation/AP hide caption

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Scopes used to diagnose gastrointestinal problems are typically cleaned and reused. Dave King/Dorling Kindersley/Science Museum, London/Science Source hide caption

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By testing tumors, researchers hoped to identify women who could avoid chemotherapy without increasing their risk of a cancer recurrence. Voisin/Phanie/Science Source hide caption

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Study Of Breast Cancer Treatment Reveals Paradox Of Precision Medicine

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An aggressive marketing campaign has made the EpiPen the go-to drug for treating anaphylaxis. Mark Zaleski/AP hide caption

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EpiPen Manufacturer Says It Will Help With Out-Of-Pocket Costs

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Hiroyuki Yamamoto, a crossing guard in Matsudo, Japan, has been trained in how to recognize and gently approach people who are wandering, or have other signs of dementia, in ways that won't frighten them. Ina Jaffe/NPR hide caption

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Japanese City Takes Community Approach To Dealing With Dementia

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