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Listen to the Invisibilia episode

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Doc Todd's hip-hop album is called Combat Medicine. Hyperion Productions/Courtesy of Doc Todd hide caption

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Hyperion Productions/Courtesy of Doc Todd

'Combat Medicine:' Afghanistan Vet Seeks To Help Others Through Hip-Hop

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Until the 1970s, most U.S. hospitals did not allow fathers into the delivery room for the birth of a child, or children. Bettmann/Bettmann Archive hide caption

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Bettmann/Bettmann Archive

This Father's Day, Remembering A Time When Dads Weren't Welcome In Delivery Rooms

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Writer Greg O'Brien and his daughter, Colleen, play with Adeline, Greg's 8-month-old granddaughter. Eight years ago, Greg was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Alzheimer's Starts To Steal The Joy Of Being A Grandfather

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In a study that tested the vision of people from a variety of professions, researchers at the University of California, Berkeley found that dressmakers who spend many hours doing fine, manual work seemed to have a superior ability to see in 3-D. Elena Fantini/Getty Images hide caption

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Elena Fantini/Getty Images
Angie Wang for NPR

The Roots Of Consciousness: We're Of 2 Minds

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Drones carrying automated external defibrillators got to the sites of previous cardiac arrest cases faster than ambulances had, according to test runs conducted by Swedish researchers. Andreas Claesson/Courtesy of FlyPulse hide caption

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Andreas Claesson/Courtesy of FlyPulse

Older adults who own dogs walk more than those who don't own dogs, and that they're moving at a good clip, a study finds. fotografixx/Getty Images hide caption

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fotografixx/Getty Images

Dog Owners Walk 22 Minutes More Per Day. And Yes, It Counts As Exercise

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Gerry Realin (left) and his wife Jessica are working to get first responders workers' compensation benefits in Florida. Abe Aboraya/WMFE hide caption

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Abe Aboraya/WMFE

A Pulse Nightclub Responder Confronts A New Crisis: PTSD

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When the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention lifted its last Zika travel advisory for Miami-Dade County last week, residents and visitors to Miami's popular South Beach neighborhood were relieved. Still, doctors say, pregnant women should continue to take extra precautions. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

New Jersey has been distributing baby boxes — cardboard containers that double as cribs or bassinets — to new parents since January. Maisha Watson is currently living in a motel outside Atlantic City, N.J., with her infant son, Solomon Murphy. With no room for a crib, Solomon sleeps in the baby box. Rebecca Davis/NPR hide caption

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Rebecca Davis/NPR

As Popularity Of Baby Boxes Grows, Skeptics Say More Testing Is Needed

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Jill Wiseman answers questions for the Contact Center based at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle. Robert Hood/Fred Hutch News Service hide caption

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Robert Hood/Fred Hutch News Service

Fetuses in the third trimester responded more often to patterns that resembled faces than to patterns that did not. BSIP/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/UIG/Getty Images

Fetuses Respond To Face-Like Patterns, Study Suggests

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Researcher Alexandra Horowitz plays with her dogs Finnegan and Upton. She studies how dog's sense of smell influences their view of the world. Vegar Abelsnes/ Courtesy of Alexandra Horowitz hide caption

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Vegar Abelsnes/ Courtesy of Alexandra Horowitz

Rogers hand feeds June, a 300-plus-pound pregnant black bear. Derek Montgomery for NPR hide caption

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Derek Montgomery for NPR

Invisibilia: Should Wild Bears Be Feared Or Befriended?

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A new study suggests that some small tumors are small because they are biologically prone to slow growth. Lester Lefkowitz/Getty Images hide caption

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Lester Lefkowitz/Getty Images

Some Small Tumors In Breasts May Not Be So Bad After All

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Max Planck Institute paleoanthropologist Jean-Jacques Hublin examines the new finds at Jebel Irhoud, in Morocco. The eye orbits of a crushed human skull more than 300,000 years old are visible just beyond his fingertip. Shannon McPherron/Nature hide caption

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Shannon McPherron/Nature

315,000-Year-Old Fossils From Morocco Could Be Earliest Recorded Homo Sapiens

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Chester with Ivory (left), 11, Skylar (right), 12, and Kameron (center), 21 months. Lauren Silverman/KERA hide caption

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Lauren Silverman/KERA

In Texas, Abstinence-Only Programs May Contribute To Teen Pregnancies

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Dad called these "his and hers chairs." He would sit beside Mom, his partner and wife of 34 years, as they got their weekly chemotherapy treatments. Howie Borowick had just been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, and wife Laurel was in treatment for breast cancer for the third time. For him, it was new and unknown. For her, it was business as usual, another appointment on her calendar. Nancy Borowick hide caption

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Nancy Borowick

NIH Director Francis Collins and Renée Fleming, who is Artistic Advisor at Large for the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., sing a duet. Shelby Knowles/NPR hide caption

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Shelby Knowles/NPR

The Soprano And The Scientist: A Conversation About Music And Medicine

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Eight different real faces were shown to a monkey. The images were then reconstructed using analyzing electrical activity from 205 neurons recorded while the monkey was viewing the faces. Courtesy of Doris Tsao/Cell Press hide caption

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Courtesy of Doris Tsao/Cell Press

Cracking The Code That Lets The Brain ID Any Face, Fast

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