Your Health : Shots - Health News There's never been more information about how to live a healthy life, yet the goal sometimes seems impossible to reach. We sort through the latest news on how to eat better, live longer and stay well.

Val Olson (from left), Rick Kamm, Steve David and Dee Haskins play up to the net during a pickleball game at Monument Valley Park in Colorado Springs, Colo., in 2011. Colorado Springs Gazette/MCT via Getty Images hide caption

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Colorado Springs Gazette/MCT via Getty Images

Dogs may not wash their paws compulsively, but some humans and canines have similar genetic mutations that may influence obsessive behavior. Ute Grabowsky/Photothek via Getty Images hide caption

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Ute Grabowsky/Photothek via Getty Images

Most employers are likely to continue paying for birth control for women. But there are exceptions. Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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MCKIBILLO/Getty Images/Imagezoo

Sleep Scientist Warns Against Walking Through Life 'In An Underslept State'

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Esther Lui for NPR

Floating Away Your Anxiety And Stress

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She's not tuning in, she's tuning inward — letting go of stress, or at least trying to, with a mindfulness app on her phone. Photo Illustration by Carolyn Rogers/NPR hide caption

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Photo Illustration by Carolyn Rogers/NPR

Mindfulness Apps Aim To Help People Disconnect From Stress

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A panel of experts has recommended that the Food and Drug Administration approve a treatment developed by Spark Therapeutics for a rare form of blindness. Spark Therapeutics hide caption

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Spark Therapeutics

FDA Panel Endorses Gene Therapy For A Form Of Childhood Blindness

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If you are suddenly unable to work for an extended period because of illness, injury or accident, long-term-disability insurance can save the day. Rich LaSalle/Getty Images hide caption

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Rich LaSalle/Getty Images

Staying healthy and knowing how to find good health care is a big challenge for college freshmen leaving home for the first time. Mauro Grigollo/Getty Images/Cultura RF hide caption

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Mauro Grigollo/Getty Images/Cultura RF

Paul Melquist says he is frustrated that his insurance costs are so high because he would like to be able to do more for his grandchildren — Adalyn, Mason and Carys — in his retirement. Courtesy of the Melquist family/KHN hide caption

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Courtesy of the Melquist family/KHN
Sara Wong for NPR

For People With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, More Exercise Isn't Better

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Flooded houses near Lake Houston on Aug. 30, after the storm called Harvey swept through. Sociologist Clare Cooper Marcus says our homes hold our emotional history — our memories, our hopes, our dreams and pain. In some ways our homes are who we are. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Brandi Chastain celebrates after scoring the winning goal of the 1999 World Cup. Hector Mata/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Mata/AFP/Getty Images

40 Years Of Athletic Support: Happy Anniversary To The Sports Bra

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"I'd lost 60 pounds in the years since my passport picture had been taken and I hardly looked like myself," writes author Haroon Moghul. "Each time I approached a border, I feared I'd be denied a visa or, worse, deported." Mark Airs/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Airs/Ikon Images/Getty Images

An Encounter At A Passport Checkpoint Offers Respite From Depression's Grip

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The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists calls the flu vaccine an "essential" part of prenatal care, for protection of the newborn as well as the woman. Infants typically don't get their own flu shot until age 6 months or later. Katherine Streeter for NPR hide caption

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Pregnant Women Should Still Get The Flu Vaccine, Doctors Advise

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WBUR reporter Martha Bebinger (right) walks with Kristin, a drug user who says she has been repeatedly sexually assaulted while high on drugs. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Women With Opioid Addiction Live With Daily Fear Of Assault, Rape

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While benzodiazepines and SSRI antidepressants are not risk-free, says Yale psychiatrist Kimberly Yonkers, "it should be reassuring that we're not seeing a huge magnitude of an effect here" on pregnancy. Hanna Barczyk for NPR hide caption

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Hanna Barczyk for NPR

Xanax Or Zoloft For Moms-To-Be: A New Study Assesses Safety

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Brian Keith Thompson, owner of the Body Electric tattoo and piercing studio in Hollywood, says he is relentless in enforcing hygiene standards. Courtesy of Body Electric Tattoo hide caption

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Courtesy of Body Electric Tattoo

Teen Wants A Tattoo? Pediatricians Say Here's How To Do It Safely

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