Tapping into millennials' compassion and activism might be the best way to motivate them to buy health coverage, says Aditi Juneja, a New York University law student. Ashley Pridmore/Courtesy of Youth Radio hide caption

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Ashley Pridmore/Courtesy of Youth Radio

Hannah Vanderkooy demonstrates the napping pod she uses at Las Cruces High School in Las Cruces, N.M. Joe Suarez for NPR hide caption

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Joe Suarez for NPR

Stressed-Out High Schoolers Advised To Try A Nap Pod

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Turns out that humans aren't the only animals that contagiously yawn. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Yawning May Promote Social Bonding Even Between Dogs And Humans

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Turns out humans are better at smelling than you might think. CSA Images/ Color Printstock Col/Vetta/Getty Images hide caption

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CSA Images/ Color Printstock Col/Vetta/Getty Images

Why Your Sense Of Smell Is Better Than You Might Think

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The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force says the risks of screening for thyroid cancer in people without symptoms outweigh the benefits. kaisersosa67/Getty Images hide caption

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kaisersosa67/Getty Images

Don't Screen For Thyroid Cancer, Task Force Says

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Violinist Adrian Pintea, from The Julliard School, plays a 1729 Stradivari known as the "Solomon, Ex-Lambert" in 2007 at Christie's in New York. Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images

Is A Stradivarius Violin Easier To Hear? Science Says Nope

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The death rate for African-Americans dropped 25 percent over 17 years, but most of that was among people ages 65 and older. Dutchy/Getty Images hide caption

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Dutchy/Getty Images

Death Rate Among Black Americans Declines, Especially For Elderly People

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Kurt Hinrichs and his wife Alice in 2015, less than a year after Kurt had a stroke. He recovered after doctors removed the clot that was blocking blood from flowing to part of his brain. Courtesy of Kurt Hinrichs hide caption

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Courtesy of Kurt Hinrichs

A Lazarus Patient And The Limits Of A Lifesaving Stroke Procedure

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John Holcroft/Ikon ImagesGetty Images

Yo-Yo Dieting May Pose Serious Risks For Heart Patients

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Chris Nickels for NPR

Listen to Kristin Laurel read her poem

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Doctors have known for a long time that alcohol consumption can cause heart problems. Researchers in Germany used the Oktoberfest beer festival to link binge drinking to abnormal heart rhythms. Dan Herrick/Lonely Planet Images/Getty Images hide caption

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An illustration of a fetal lamb inside the "artificial womb" device, which mimics the conditions inside a pregnant animal. The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia hide caption

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The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Scientists Create Artificial Womb That Could Help Prematurely Born Babies

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Kristen Uroda for NPR

Is It Time For Hearing Aids To Be Sold Over The Counter?

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