Your Health : Shots - Health News There's never been more information about how to live a healthy life, yet the goal sometimes seems impossible to reach. We sort through the latest news on how to eat better, live longer and stay well.

Residents of the community of Tujunga, Calif., flee a fire near Burbank on Sept. 2. Even people much farther from the flames are feeling health effects from acrid smoke. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

Is All That Wildfire Smoke Damaging My Lungs?

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Young bodies may more easily rebound from long bouts of sitting, with just an hour at the gym. But research suggests physical recovery from binge TV-watching gets harder in our 50s and as we get older. Lily Padula for NPR hide caption

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Lily Padula for NPR

Get Off The Couch Baby Boomers, Or You May Not Be Able To Later

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Dr. R. Michael Tuttle, an endocrinologist at New York's Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, talks with Debonis about an ultrasound of the thyroid tumor. Courtesy of Memorial Sloan Kettering hide caption

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Courtesy of Memorial Sloan Kettering

Mowing the lawn can be good exercise, and is fun for some people. But others who find themselves squeezed for time might find the luxury of paying someone else to do it to be of much more value than buying more stuff. Kristen Solecki for NPR hide caption

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Kristen Solecki for NPR

Need A Happiness Boost? Spend Your Money To Buy Time, Not More Stuff

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While many women experience miscarriage, few talk about it openly. But researchers have found there is discussion and a lot of sharing happening on social media. Their hope is that greater public discourse will help reduce stigma and the sense of isolation that some women feel. Sara Wong for NPR hide caption

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Sara Wong for NPR

Researchers aren't sure why strong relationships in adolescence seem to pay dividends later in life, but one hypothesis is that those bonds act as a buffer against depression and insults. Maria Fabrizio for NPR hide caption

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Simply going up in pitch at the end of a sentence can transform a statement into a question. Lizzie Roberts/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Lizzie Roberts/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Really? Really. How Our Brains Figure Out What Words Mean Based On How They're Said

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Some YouTube stars seek counseling and take breaks from online life to deal with symptoms of anxiety. Eva Bee/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Bee/Ikon Images/Getty Images

YouTube Stars Stress Out, Just Like The Rest Of Us

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Vanessa Wauchope begins abdominal exercises in Leah Keller's class in San Francisco, Calif. Keller teaches an exercise, called "drawing in," to help strengthen abdominal muscles that tend to spread apart a bit during pregnancy. Talia Herman for NPR hide caption

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Talia Herman for NPR

A partial solar eclipse (left) is seen from the Cotswolds, United Kingdom, while a total solar eclipse is seen from Longyearbyen, Norway, in March 2015. Tim Graham/Getty Images/Haakon Mosvold Larsen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Graham/Getty Images/Haakon Mosvold Larsen/AFP/Getty Images

Be Smart: A Partial Eclipse Can Fry Your Naked Eyes

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While doctors and nurses have an ethical duty to treat all patients, they are not immune to feelings of dread when it comes to patients who are hateful or belligerent. A well-known article from the 1970s spoke to this. Sally Elford/Getty Images hide caption

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Sally Elford/Getty Images

The Homeland Security website Ready.gov warns that following a nuclear blast, you should wash your hair with shampoo but not use conditioner, because conditioner can bind radioactive material to your hair. Smith Collection/Getty Images hide caption

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Smith Collection/Getty Images

Arthritis is a joint disease that can cause cartilage destruction and erosion of the bone, as well as tendon inflammation and rupture. Affected areas are highlighted in red in this enhanced X-ray. Philippe Sellem/Paul Demri/ Voisin/Science Source hide caption

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Philippe Sellem/Paul Demri/ Voisin/Science Source

6,000-Year-Old Knee Joints Suggest Osteoarthritis Isn't Just Wear And Tear

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Surface stains from things like coffee, tea, tobacco and red wine can be lightened with routine brushing, flossing and professional cleaning in the dental office. But deeper stains that come with age and damage to the tooth require bleaching agents or veneers. Katherine Streeter for NPR hide caption

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Navigating The 'Aisle Of Confusion' To Whiten Your Teeth

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