Shots - Health News

Shots - Health NewsShots - Health News

Health News From NPR

Kalu James moved to Austin, Texas, eight years ago, but bought health insurance for the first time this year. Twenty percent of the city's musicians live below the federal poverty line. Veronica Zaragovia/KUT hide caption

toggle caption Veronica Zaragovia/KUT

Human stem cells, in this case made from adult skin cells, can give rise to any sort of human cell. Some scientists would like to insert such cells into nonhuman, animal embryos, in hopes of one day growing human organs for transplantation. Science Source hide caption

toggle caption Science Source

Women can get a free pregnancy test and a free ultrasound at the clinic, as well as counseling regarding three options — parenting, adoption and abortion. The clinic will not refer clients for abortions. Becky Sullivan/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Becky Sullivan/NPR

Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia M. Burwell says she's willing to work with Texas leaders to craft a unique Medicaid plan for the state. Kevin Dietsch/UPI/Landov hide caption

toggle caption Kevin Dietsch/UPI/Landov

Aurora Sinai Medical Center in Milwaukee has found that connecting people with primary care doctors reduces the number of emergency room visits. Courtesy of Aurora Health Care hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Aurora Health Care

Mentally ill prisoners too impaired to stand trial are supposed to be transferred to state mental hospitals for treatment within two or three months. But more than 300 in California are languishing in county jails because hospitals don't have the beds. Christian Schmidt/Corbis hide caption

toggle caption Christian Schmidt/Corbis

A shuttle bus exits a secure gate at Napa State Hospital after a media tour in 2011. J.L. Sousa/ hide caption

toggle caption J.L. Sousa/

Gov. Jerry Brown signed California's Medicaid expansion bill into law in June 2013. Since then, the number of people enrolled in Medi-Cal, the state's version of Medicaid, has surged. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

toggle caption Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Rep. Joe Courtney, D-Conn., proposed a bill in April to repeal the impending excise tax on employee health benefits that Obamacare deems excessive. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc. hide caption

toggle caption Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc.

Debbie Ziegler holds a photo of her late daughter, Brittany Maynard, after the California State Assembly approved a right-to-die measure on Sept. 9. Maynard died on Nov. 1, 2014. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

toggle caption Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Laticia Aossey was hospitalized while a student at the University of Northern Iowa when she realized she hadn't signed up for health insurance. Matthew Putney/Courtesy of Youth Today hide caption

toggle caption Matthew Putney/Courtesy of Youth Today

In 1954, Dr. Frederick C. Robbins, then chief of pediatrics and contagious diseases at Cleveland Metropolitan General Hospital, was one of three winners of that year's Nobel Prize in medicine. The scientists' work, which led to a vaccine against polio, was performed in human fetal cells. AP hide caption

toggle caption AP

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton has ideas about how to rein in health costs that hit consumers in the pocketbook. But would they work? Darren McCollester/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Darren McCollester/Getty Images

Jane Garcia, CEO of La Clinica de la Raza, which serves 25,000 patients in Contra Costa County, Calif., addresses supporters of expanding health care for undocumented adults. Farida Jhabvala Romero/KQED hide caption

toggle caption Farida Jhabvala Romero/KQED

Doris Keene (right) talks with her acupuncturist before a treatment at Portland's Quest Center for Integrative Health. Keene says the treatments have eased her chronic back pain at least as effectively as the Vicodin and muscle relaxants she once relied on. Kristian Foden-Vencil/Oregon Public Broadcasting hide caption

toggle caption Kristian Foden-Vencil/Oregon Public Broadcasting

Marilyn Kruse couldn't get health insurance through her job as a substitute teacher in Jefferson County, Colo. Now she buys insurance through the state's health exchange. John Daley/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption John Daley/Colorado Public Radio

A Medicaid office employee works on reports at Montefiore Medical Center in New York in late 2014. New York expanded Medicaid eligibility under the Affordable Care Act and enrollment surged. Julie Jacobson/AP hide caption

toggle caption Julie Jacobson/AP