Policy-ish : Shots - Health News Who gets what sort of care often boils down to big decisions about policy. Find the latest on the federal health overhaul, the intersection of government regulation and health, and the battle to contain costs.

President Trump spoke from the White House in July in an effort to promote health overhaul legislation. He's now trying to make changes through an executive order. The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/Getty Images

Trump Says He'll Sign Order To Expand Health Insurance Options

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Neal Siegel, who lives with his girlfriend, Beth Wargo, is one of six disabled Iowans suing the state over its privatized Medicaid program. Clay Masters/IPR hide caption

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Clay Masters/IPR

Demonstrators in Washington, D.C., argued for upholding the Affordable Care Act's birth control provision in 2015. The rollback of the rule is likely to spur further lawsuits, analysts say. Charles Dharapak/AP hide caption

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Charles Dharapak/AP

Trump Guts Requirement That Employer Health Plans Pay For Birth Control

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The contents of a drug overdose rescue kit at a May 13, 2015, training session in Buffalo, N.Y., on how to administer naloxone, which reverses the effects of heroin and prescription painkillers. Carolyn Thompson/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Thompson/AP

To Save Opioid Addicts, This Experimental Court Is Ditching The Delays

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Drug lobbyists and consumer health advocates fill the halls of the state Capitol in September to see how Assembly members vote on a controversial drug price transparency bill. Tam Ma/Courtesy of Health Access California hide caption

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Tam Ma/Courtesy of Health Access California

California Bill Would Compel Drugmakers To Justify Price Hikes

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Guttmacher Institute

For Many Women, The Nearest Abortion Provider Is Hundreds Of Miles Away

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Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, center, and ranking member Ron Wyden, D-Ore., have a plan to renew funding for the Children's Health Insurance Program, which lapsed Sept. 30. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Secretary of Health and Human Services Tom Price, shown here at a discussion about opioids on Thursday, drew fire for his use of private jets. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Throughout the U.S., minors are generally required to have permission from a parent or legal guardian before they can receive most medical treatment. However, each state has established a number of exceptions. PhotoAttractive/Getty Images hide caption

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PhotoAttractive/Getty Images

Bernard Tyson, CEO of Kaiser Permanente, is optimistic about a bipartisan health bill. He cautions that partisanship will only lead to more insurance instability. Misha Friedman/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Misha Friedman/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Kaiser Permanente CEO Says A Bipartisan Health Bill Is The Best Way Forward

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Sens. Lindsey Graham (from left), Bill Cassidy and Majority Leader Mitch McConnell take questions during a press conference Tuesday. Graham and Cassidy were among the co-sponsors of a proposal to overhaul the Affordable Care Act. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Piper Su, seen here with her son, Elliot, lives in Alexandria, Va. She has registered with several transplant centers in hopes of increasing the odds of getting an organ. Courtesy of Piper Su hide caption

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Courtesy of Piper Su

Searching For A Fairer Way To Distribute Donor Livers

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Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., continues to tweak the health care bill he cosponsors in an effort to persuade reluctant senators to back it. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Two-year-old Robbie Klein of West Roxbury, Mass., has hemophilia, a medical condition that interferes with his blood's ability to clot normally. His parents, both teachers, worry that his condition could make it hard for them to get insurance to cover his expensive medications if the law changes. Jesse Costa/Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/Jesse Costa/WBUR

Harrison Browne, seen here playing for the Buffalo Beauts, says he feels lucky to be part of a league that accepts him and wants him to feel comfortable. Courtesy of the National Women's Hockey League hide caption

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Courtesy of the National Women's Hockey League

Charlene Yurgaitis gets health insurance through Medicaid in Pennsylvania. It covers the counseling and medication she and her doctors say she needs to recover from her opioid addiction. Ben Allen/WITF hide caption

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Ben Allen/WITF

Protesters rally against Medicaid cuts in front of the U.S. Capitol in June. Medicaid is the nation's largest health insurance program, covering 74 million people — more than 1 in 5 Americans. Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/Getty Images

Entrepreneur Stinson Dean (left) and his wife Stephanie play with their three children in their yard in Independence, Mo. He says the Affordable Care Act made it possible for him to start his own business. Alex Smith/KCUR hide caption

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Alex Smith/KCUR

Uncertainty Over Health Care Law's Future Hobbles Entrepreneurs

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Some people seeking Medicare penalty waivers have experienced delays at their local Social Security Administration offices. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Sen. Lindsey Graham, second from left, speaks as Sen. John Barrasso, from left, Sen. Bill Cassidy, Sen. John Thune and Senate Majority Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell listen during a news briefing Tuesday. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Kathy Niakan, a developmental biologist at the Francis Crick Institute in London, used the CRISPR gene editing technique to find out how a gene affects the growth of human embryos. Courtesy of The Francis Crick Institute hide caption

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Courtesy of The Francis Crick Institute

Editing Embryo DNA Yields Clues About Early Human Development

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