The goal was to make sure hospitals didn't send patients home too soon, without a plan for following up or without enough support at home to recover completely. Science Photo Library / Getty Images hide caption

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Lee Cantrell, an associate professor of clinical pharmacology at the University of California, San Diego, with a collection of vintage expired medications. Sandy Huffaker for ProPublica hide caption

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Sandy Huffaker for ProPublica

That Drug Expiration Date May Be More Myth Than Fact

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Two-year-old Robbie Klein has hemophilia, a medical condition that interferes with his blood's ability to clot normally. Without insurance, the daily medications he needs to stay healthy could cost hundreds of thousands of dollars or more each year. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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In Massachusetts, Proposed Medicaid Cuts Put Kids' Health Care At Risk

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Association-based health insurance could have a lot of appeal for restaurants and other businesses with younger, healthier workers. Tetra Images/Getty Images/ hide caption

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A survey of Medicaid beneficiaries found that overall, they're very happy with the services they get and have no problems finding doctors. Terry Vine/Getty Images hide caption

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Survey Says: Medicaid Recipients Really Like Their Coverage And Care

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A provision in the bill proposed by the GOP Senate would permit Medicaid to pay for longer stints of inpatient psychiatric care. But other parts of the bill would strip $772 billion from Medicaid — the single-largest funder of care for people who have schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or another serious mental illness. B. Boissonnet/Getty Images hide caption

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Medicaid spending on medications used to treat opioid addiction has risen sharply in recent years. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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The GOP health bills would eliminate the 10 percent tax on the use of tanning beds. It was one of more than a dozen taxes introduced as part of the Affordable Care Act. Robert Gauthier/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Greta Elliott, who manages a health clinic in Canby, Calif., says she didn't buy health insurance for herself because she thinks it's too expensive. April Dembosky/KQED hide caption

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In A Conservative Corner Of California, A Push To Preserve Obamacare

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Scientists Are Not So Hot At Predicting Which Cancer Studies Will Succeed

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Hugo, Colo., is home to no more than 850 residents, but has a beloved hospital where staff members know most of their patients by name. To survive financially, the hospital depends on payments from Medicaid, a program that faces deep cuts in the GOP health bill. Hart Van Denburg/CPR hide caption

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A Hospital In Rural Colorado Is The Cornerstone Of Small Town Life

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Clara Hardy (middle) with her parents, Robert and Chrissy. Clara, who lives in North Carolina, needed expensive surgery and other procedures right after birth to save her life. The family's insurance policy paid most of the cost. Alex Olgin/WFAE hide caption

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GOP Health Bill Could Let Insurers Cap Spending On Expensive Patients

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Will My High Premiums Go Down? More Q&A About The GOP Health Plan

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Patients who underwent genetic screenings now fear that documentation of the results in their medical records could lead to problems if a new health law is enacted. Sam Edwards/Caiaimage/Getty Images hide caption

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Former bookkeeper Betty Redlin, 88, broke a hip a few years ago and was never able to walk again. She's on Medi-Cal, California's version of Medicaid. Ina Jaffe/NPR hide caption

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Nursing Homes Worry Proposed Medicaid Cuts Will Force Cuts, Closures

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Less than half of the 22 million veterans in the U.S. get their health care through the Veterans Affairs system. Many rely on Medicaid, which is slated for reductions under the health plan making its way through the U.S. Senate. bwilking/Getty Images hide caption

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Veterans Helped By Obamacare Worry About Republican Repeal Efforts

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