With Tom Price now at the helm of the Department of Health and Human Services, the administration has made its first regulatory proposal to change how people would sign up for Obamacare coverage. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc. hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc.

Shorter Enrollment Period For Obamacare Proposed By Administration

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Editing human genes that would be passed on for generations could make sense if the diseases are serious and the right safeguards are in places, a scientific panel says. Claude Edelmann/Science Source hide caption

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Claude Edelmann/Science Source

Scientific Panel Says Editing Heritable Human Genes Could Be OK In The Future

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Joseph Funn experienced homelessness for almost 20 years, until he moved into an apartment in December. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Obamacare Helped The Homeless, Who Now Worry About Coverage Repeal

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Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., seen here with Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., at a Jan. 18 hearing of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, says he'd like to see the individual insurance market fixed before repealing Obamacare. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Maureen O'Connell leads an insurance talk in St. Paul, Minn., in 2013 to help attendees understand how the federal health law could affect them. Jim Mone/AP hide caption

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Jim Mone/AP

With Congress vowing to repeal the Affordable Care Act, health insurance executives are looking at a very uncertain future. And they don't like uncertainty. Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images

Health Insurers Say They Don't Want To Go Back To Being The Bad Guys

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As Indiana Governor, Mike Pence announced in 2015 that the federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services approved a waiver for the state's Medicaid experiment. Michael Conroy/AP hide caption

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Michael Conroy/AP

Rep. Tom Price, President Trump's nominee for Secretary of Health and Human Services, has criticized a task force of medical experts whose recommendations guide health screening and disease prevention. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Meg Ivatti (right), a manager at HealthSource RI, the state's insurance exchange, works with Dianiri Paulino to help a caller sign up for coverage in 2014. Stephan Savoia/AP hide caption

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Stephan Savoia/AP

For Rhode Island, Interstate Health Insurance Sales Didn't Pan Out

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HealthCare.gov's open enrollment for 2017 started Nov. 1 and ends on Tuesday. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Last Chance To Sign Up For Obamacare, For 2017 And Maybe Forever

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Physical therapy may not help a person with a progressive chronic disease become well, but it can help slow a decline. Hero Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Medicaid doesn't just provide health care for the poor; it also pays for long-term care for a lot of older people, including the majority of nursing home residents. Repealing the ACA could change the way Medicaid programs are funded. Bill Gallery/Doctor Stock/Science Faction/Getty Images hide caption

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Obamacare Repeal Could Threaten Provisions That Help Older Adults

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James Bounds is a West Virginia miner with black lung disease; it took him 4 1/2 years to get compensation benefits. A provision in Obamacare later made qualifying for those benefits much easier. Kara Lofton/West Virginia Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Kara Lofton/West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Obamacare Repeal Threatens A Health Benefit Popular In Coal Country

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Kellyanne Conway, now an adviser to President Donald Trump and seen here at a November campaign rally, said on NBC News that the Trump administration plans to move Medicaid financing to block grants administered by states. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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President Donald Trump, flanked by Vice President Mike Pence and Chief of Staff Reince Priebus, signs his first executive order on health care, on Friday. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Some ethicists and consumer watchdog groups worry that the newly revised federal rules governing medical research don't go far enough to protect the rights and privacy of patients. Dana Neely/Getty Images hide caption

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Secretary of Health and Human Services nominee Rep. Tom Price, R-Ga., (right) and Sen. Johnny Isakson, R-Ga., get settled before the start of Price's confirmation hearing Wednesday before the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call,Inc. hide caption

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