Policy-ish : Shots - Health News Who gets what sort of care often boils down to big decisions about policy. Find the latest on the federal health overhaul, the intersection of government regulation and health, and the battle to contain costs.

President Trump at a listening session with health insurance executives at the White House earlier this year. Aude Guerrucci/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Aude Guerrucci/Bloomberg/Getty Images

At his golf club in Bedminster, N.J., on Thursday President Trump called the opioid epidemic a national emergency and said his administration was drawing up papers to make it official. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

What Could Happen If Trump Formally Declares Opioids A National Emergency

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Deona Scott and her son Phoenix at her graduation from Charleston Southern University in South Carolina in 2015. Scott now works full time for Nurse-Family Partnership, a program she credits with helping to prepare her to be a good mother. Courtesy of Deona Scott hide caption

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Courtesy of Deona Scott

University of Vermont medical students in the school's new Larner classroom, built to facilitate the active learning environment. Andy Duback/Courtesy of Larner College of Medicine hide caption

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Andy Duback/Courtesy of Larner College of Medicine

Vermont Medical School Says Goodbye To Lectures

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Some medical professionals say declaring a national emergency could make Naloxone, a drug that treats opioid overdoses, more readily available. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Should The Opioid Crisis Be Declared A National Emergency?

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President Trump still hopes to force legislators back to the table to find a way to get rid of the Affordable Care Act, by any means possible. Tasos Katopodis /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis /AFP/Getty Images

Although consuming cannabis is legal in Colorado and several other states, driving while under the influence of the drug is not. Nick Pedersen/Getty Images hide caption

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Nick Pedersen/Getty Images

Scientists Still Seek A Reliable DUI Test For Marijuana

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., joined by (from left) Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., and Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn of Texas, discussed health care overhaul with reporters on Capitol Hill Tuesday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Tara Lang was pregnant with her daughter when her fiance was killed in a motorcycle crash. A pregnancy center in Metairie, La., helped her sign up for Medicaid coverage. Jessica Rosgaard/WWNO hide caption

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Jessica Rosgaard/WWNO

How Crisis Pregnancy Center Clients Rely On Medicaid

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Tessa Anklin says Covered California health plans are too expensive for her family. April Dembosky/KQED hide caption

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April Dembosky/KQED

Rural Californians Want Price Relief From GOP Health Bill, But Most Won't Get It

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Vice President Mike Pence, right, and White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus arrive on Capitol Hill on Tuesday for the Senate procedural vote on health care overhaul. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

The morphine-like pain killer Oxycontin is just one of a number of opioids fueling a substance use crisis in the U.S. federal health officials say. And successful treatment for the substance use disorder can be costly. Leonard Lessin/Getty Images/Science Source hide caption

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Leonard Lessin/Getty Images/Science Source

Opioid Treatment Funds In Senate Bill Would Fall Far Short Of Needs

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Tymia McCullough is a poised, pageant-winning 11-year-old from South Carolina. She also happens to have sickle cell anemia and relies on Medicaid to pay for medical care. Liam James Doyle/NPR hide caption

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Liam James Doyle/NPR

Her Own Medical Future At Stake, A Child Storms Capitol Hill

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The goal was to make sure hospitals didn't send patients home too soon, without a plan for following up or without enough support at home to recover completely. Science Photo Library / Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library / Getty Images

Lee Cantrell, an associate professor of clinical pharmacology at the University of California, San Diego, with a collection of vintage expired medications. Sandy Huffaker for ProPublica hide caption

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Sandy Huffaker for ProPublica

That Drug Expiration Date May Be More Myth Than Fact

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Two-year-old Robbie Klein has hemophilia, a medical condition that interferes with his blood's ability to clot normally. Without insurance, the daily medications he needs to stay healthy could cost hundreds of thousands of dollars or more each year. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

In Massachusetts, Proposed Medicaid Cuts Put Kids' Health Care At Risk

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Association-based health insurance could have a lot of appeal for restaurants and other businesses with younger, healthier workers. Tetra Images/Getty Images/ hide caption

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