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Mardi Palan, a hair stylist in Portland, Ore., is hoping to become a surrogate for a couple from Israel. Kristian Foden-Vencil/OPB hide caption

itoggle caption Kristian Foden-Vencil/OPB

An analysis shows the monthly premiums for many people with Obamacare policies will not much change in 2016. But the high increases of some policies are drawing fire. Rob Colvin/ImageZoo/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Rob Colvin/ImageZoo/Corbis

Health plans begun under the Affordable Care Act are required to cover FDA-approved contraceptive methods without cost to members. Older plans are exempt from that rule. iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto

Carol and John Iovine say the health coach their insurer assigned John after he had a torrent of grave health problems in 2014 has helped them get the medical care he still needs. And it's helped keep him out of the hospital. Todd Bookman/WHYY hide caption

itoggle caption Todd Bookman/WHYY

An Access Health CT location in New Britain, Conn. Courtesy of Access Health CT hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Access Health CT

The staff at the Charlotte Community Health Clinic: Nancy Hudson (left), Maria Elena Solanilla, Tonya Luna, Lisa Ortiz-Fraticelli, Charm May Agustin, Martha Brinsko and Tamara Withers-Thompson. Michael Tomsic/WFAE hide caption

itoggle caption Michael Tomsic/WFAE

Diagnosis by text or a phone call is often convenient and popular with patients. But is it good medicine? Apriori/iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption Apriori/iStockphoto

There are legal questions about how far employers can go to encourage participation in wellness programs. Bjorn Rune Lie/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Bjorn Rune Lie/Ikon Images/Getty Images

While governor of Texas, Rick Perry refused to accept federal funds to expand Medicaid. Rick Wilking/Reuters/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Rick Wilking/Reuters/Landov

Tuesday's decision by the U.S. Supreme Court to not review an ordinance passed by Alameda County, California, means that drug makers will now need to pay for collection and disposal of unused drugs in the county. iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto

Retired California school teacher Mikkel Lawrence sits with his cat, Max. Lawrence has hepatitis C and has struggled to afford the medicine he needs to treat it. April Dembosky/KQED hide caption

itoggle caption April Dembosky/KQED