Carl Goulden, of Littlestown Pa., developed hepatitis B 10 years ago. Soon his health insurance premiums soared beyond a price he and his wife could afford. Elana Gordon/WHYY hide caption

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Elana Gordon/WHYY

U.S. Health Care Wrestles With The 'Pre-Existing Condition'

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How U.S. Health Care Became Big Business

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An EpiPen Jr. epinephrine auto-injector. Some EpiPens have been recalled from the U.S. market over concerns that they could fail to activate when people try to use them. Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Gilead Sciences Inc. makes the two leading drugs that can quickly cure hepatitis C infections. But most patients can't afford the expensive drugs, and states restrict their use among Medicaid patients. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Should The U.S. Government Buy A Drug Company To Save Money?

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Rep. Lloyd Doggett, D-Texas, is promoting a campaign to get the National Institutes of Health to exercise the patent rights it already owns in regards to certain drugs to bring down their price. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc. hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc.

One Way To Force Down Drug Prices: Have The U.S. Exercise Its Patent Rights

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Advocates of paying a family doctor a flat monthly fee for office visits and some lab work say it saves patients money when coupled with a high-deductible insurance plan. Ridofranz/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Ridofranz/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Dr. C. David Molina reviewing medical records in the 1980s. He was a doctor first, then a health insurer. Courtesy of Molina Healthcare hide caption

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Courtesy of Molina Healthcare

This CEO's Small Insurance Firm Mostly Turned A Profit Under Obamacare. Here's How

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Anemic patients did not know about their condition during a testosterone trial. Renphoto/Getty Images hide caption

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Renphoto/Getty Images

Researchers Failed To Tell Testosterone Trial Patients They Were Anemic

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Several new studies show mixed results for men taking testosterone supplements. Garo/Phanie/Passage/Getty Images hide caption

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Garo/Phanie/Passage/Getty Images

Does Testosterone Improve Older Men's Health? It Depends

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A health savings account works much like a personal savings account — with a difference. Any money in it that we use to pay for certain medical expenses isn't taxed. Oivind Hovland/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Oivind Hovland/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, is looking into how the Orphan Drug Act may be affecting a wide range of drug prices. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

While Republicans in Congress are talking about taking their time to change the Affordable Care Act, insurers are already struggling to figure out what to charge for coverage in 2018. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Mary Lynne Bill-Old Coyote, Montana's director of Indian health, says the ACA has helped build the community by providing job opportunities. Montana saw 3 percent growth last year in the number of health care jobs. Courtesy of Thom Bridge/Helena Independent Record hide caption

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Courtesy of Thom Bridge/Helena Independent Record

Obamacare Brought Jobs To Indian Country That Could Vanish With Repeal

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Medicare accounts for about 29 percent of all spending on prescription medicines in the U.S. each year. stevecoleimages/iStockphoto/Getty Images hide caption

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Medicare Should Leverage Buying Power To Pull Down Drug Prices, White House Says

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Speaker of the House Paul Ryan has long promoted what he calls his "Better Way Plan" to replace the Affordable Care Act. But Republicans in Congress have yet to coalesce around any of several approaches to replacement. Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto via Getty Images

As Republicans look for ways to loosen the Affordable Care Act's coverage requirements, sales of short-term health insurance policies could take off. Petrol/Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Lee, executive director of Covered California, speaks during an enrollment event in Grand Park, in front of Los Angeles City Hall, on Nov. 14. Gary Friedman/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Friedman/LA Times via Getty Images