Health Inc. : Shots - Health News As spending on care rises, the business of health keeps getting more important. We feature news on and analysis of drugmakers, health insurers, hospitals, doctors and others in the business of providing health care.

The Senate health committee meets next month to discuss ways to stabilize the insurance markets. Insurers have until Sept. 27 to commit to selling policies on the ACA marketplaces in 2018. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

A California jury awarded a woman $417 million in a case against Johnson & Johnson. The woman claimed that her use of Johnson's Baby Powder led to terminal ovarian cancer. Scientists disagree on how strong a link there is between talc and ovarian cancer. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Does Baby Powder Cause Cancer? A Jury Says Yes. Scientists Aren't So Sure

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About 50 percent of patients don't take their medicine as prescribed, research shows. And those mistakes are thought to result in at least 100,000 preventable deaths each year. amphotora/Getty Images hide caption

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'Smart' Pill Bottles Aren't Always Enough To Help The Medicine Go Down

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Dillon Katz, at home in Delray Beach, Fla., says recovering drug users in his group counseling meetings frequently used to offer to help him get into a new treatment facility. He suspects now they were recruiters — so-called "body brokers" — who were receiving illegal kickbacks from the corrupt facility. Peter Haden/WLRN hide caption

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Peter Haden/WLRN

'Body Brokers' Get Kickbacks To Lure People With Addictions To Bad Rehab

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A recent study shows a link between high discharge rates for live patients and hospice profit margins. Gary Waters/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Nearly 1 In 5 Hospice Patients Discharged While Still Alive

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Andrew Ladd and Fumiko Chino at their wedding in 2006, after his cancer diagnosis. Ladd died the following year, leaving behind hundreds of thousands of dollars in medical debt. Courtesy of Dr. Fumiko Chino hide caption

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Courtesy of Dr. Fumiko Chino

Widowed Early, A Cancer Doctor Writes About The Harm Of Medical Debt

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A recent study in Delray Beach identified at least six sober homes on this street alone. Greg Allen /NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen /NPR

Beach Town Tries To Reverse Runaway Growth Of 'Sober Homes'

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Valeant Pharmaceuticals, based in Bridgewater Township, N.J., bought two specialty heart drugs used in emergency treatment from Marathon Pharmaceuticals in 2015, and then dramatically increased each drug's price. Ron Antonelli/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Ron Antonelli/Bloomberg via Getty Images

First responders in Washington, D.C., bring naloxone on every emergency call. Shelby Knowles/NPR hide caption

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Shelby Knowles/NPR

First Responders Spending More On Overdose Reversal Drug

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Vicki Reid, right, holds a likeness of John Martin, who was then CEO of the pharmaceutical company Gilead Sciences. Reid and others were protesting high drug prices in front of the conference on retroviruses and opportunistic infections — a meeting held at the World Congress Center in Atlanta in March 2013. John Amis/AP Images for AIDS Healthcare Foundation hide caption

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John Amis/AP Images for AIDS Healthcare Foundation

As Cost Of U.S. Health Care Skyrockets, So Does Pay Of Health Care CEOs

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Patient information can be vulnerable when health care facilities are the focus of cyberattacks. Eric Audras/Onoky/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Audras/Onoky/Getty Images

Hospitals Face Growing Cybersecurity Threats

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Alex Brandon/AP

Uncertainty Over Obamacare Leaves Next Year's Rates In Limbo

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A mountain of mine tailings frame a Bisbee park — a legacy of the copper mines that once fueled the local economy. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

Doctor Shortage In Rural Arizona Sparks Another Crisis In 'Forgotten America'

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Michael McBrayer tests his blood sugar before eating lunch. He gets supplies he needs to manage diabetes for free as part of a deal between his employer and health insurer. Evan Frost/MPR News hide caption

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Evan Frost/MPR News

Health Insurers Try Paying More Up Front To Pay Less Later

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Half of all the debt that appears on credit reports is related to medical expenses, according to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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Steve Daines of Montana (right) talks with fellow Republican Sens. Mitch McConnell and Pat Roberts in a White House meeting in June on the GOP health care strategy, which would include deep cuts to Medicaid. Montana insurers say the plan worries them. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Montana Insurers Say Medicaid Cuts Would Drive Up Cost Of Private Health Plans

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A GAO report questions the quality of a number of Medicare Advantage plans after large numbers of sicker enrollees dropped them. Yellow Dog Productions/Getty Images hide caption

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Coal and steel jobs were once plentiful in Steubenville, Ohio. Today, the local hospital is the top employer in the county. Courtesy of Rana Xavier hide caption

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Courtesy of Rana Xavier

After Decline Of Steel And Coal, Ohio Fears Health Care Jobs Are Next

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In theory, "direct primary care" should result in better health for patients and lower health care costs overall. But some analysts say that approach just encourages the worried well to get more care than they need. BraunS /Getty Images hide caption

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Kim Ryu for NPR

A Drugmaker Tries To Cash In On The Opioid Epidemic, One State Law At A Time

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