Legal issues — evictions, domestic violence, or insurance claim denials, for example — all too often can cascade into problems with bad medical outcomes. Sam Edwards/Caiaimage/Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Edwards/Caiaimage/Getty Images

French pharmaceutical group Sanofi is expected to receive an exclusive license to market a new Zika vaccine. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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States Fear Price Of New Zika Vaccine Will Be More Than They Can Pay

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There are many reasons someone could end up having a lapse in health insurance. They might need to move closer to a caregiver or treatment center, for example, and consequently have to quit their job — and lose their insurance. Portra Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Carl Goulden, of Littlestown Pa., developed hepatitis B 10 years ago. Soon his health insurance premiums soared beyond a price he and his wife could afford. Elana Gordon/WHYY hide caption

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Elana Gordon/WHYY

U.S. Health Care Wrestles With The 'Pre-Existing Condition'

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How U.S. Health Care Became Big Business

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An EpiPen Jr. epinephrine auto-injector. Some EpiPens have been recalled from the U.S. market over concerns that they could fail to activate when people try to use them. Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Gilead Sciences Inc. makes the two leading drugs that can quickly cure hepatitis C infections. But most patients can't afford the expensive drugs, and states restrict their use among Medicaid patients. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Should The U.S. Government Buy A Drug Company To Save Money?

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Rep. Lloyd Doggett, D-Texas, is promoting a campaign to get the National Institutes of Health to exercise the patent rights it already owns in regards to certain drugs to bring down their price. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc. hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc.

One Way To Force Down Drug Prices: Have The U.S. Exercise Its Patent Rights

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Advocates of paying a family doctor a flat monthly fee for office visits and some lab work say it saves patients money when coupled with a high-deductible insurance plan. Ridofranz/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Ridofranz/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Dr. C. David Molina reviewing medical records in the 1980s. He was a doctor first, then a health insurer. Courtesy of Molina Healthcare hide caption

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Courtesy of Molina Healthcare

This CEO's Small Insurance Firm Mostly Turned A Profit Under Obamacare. Here's How

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Anemic patients did not know about their condition during a testosterone trial. Renphoto/Getty Images hide caption

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Renphoto/Getty Images

Researchers Failed To Tell Testosterone Trial Patients They Were Anemic

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Several new studies show mixed results for men taking testosterone supplements. Garo/Phanie/Passage/Getty Images hide caption

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Garo/Phanie/Passage/Getty Images

Does Testosterone Improve Older Men's Health? It Depends

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A health savings account works much like a personal savings account — with a difference. Any money in it that we use to pay for certain medical expenses isn't taxed. Oivind Hovland/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Oivind Hovland/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, is looking into how the Orphan Drug Act may be affecting a wide range of drug prices. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP