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Susan Cahill, owner of All Families Healthcare, stands in front of the first building in Kalispell, Mont., where she offered abortion services. After vandalism closed her last clinic down, Missoula became the nearest place for women in the Flathead Valley to find abortion services. Corin Cates-Carney/MTPR hide caption

itoggle caption Corin Cates-Carney/MTPR

The area around the confluence of the Silverthrone and Klinaklini glaciers in southwestern British Columbia provides a glimpse into how the terrain traveled by Native Americans in Pleistocene times may have appeared. David J. Meltzer/Science hide caption

itoggle caption David J. Meltzer/Science

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At a Minecraft camp in Shaker Heights, Ohio, kids trade secrets about making their virtual worlds come to life. Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN hide caption

itoggle caption Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN

A user prepares drugs for injection in 2014 in St. Johnsbury, Vt. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Most of the people who got measles in last year's outbreaks hadn't been vaccinated with the MMR vaccine. Photo illustration by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Photo illustration by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Officer Ted Simola, a member of the LAPD mental evaluation unit, responds to a call in February. Maya Sugarman/KPCC hide caption

itoggle caption Maya Sugarman/KPCC

Donetta Held unloads needles and pipes confiscated from a contaminated meth home. She owns an environmental decontamination company and says meth tests are their most demanded service. Barbara Brosher/WFIU hide caption

itoggle caption Barbara Brosher/WFIU

Parents rally against SB 277, a California measure requiring schoolchildren to get vaccinated, outside the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Rich Pedroncelli/AP

In Cheyenne, Wyo., emergency room patients who show up more than a few times a month requesting pain pills will now be told no, except in dire emergencies. A similar program at a New Mexico hospital cut ER visits by 5 percent annually, and saved $500,000. iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto

Nurse Brittany Combs of Scottsburg, Ind., delivers clean needles to a member of the needle exchange program. Users must have a membership ID card to exchange needles. Seth Herald for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Seth Herald for NPR