Vanessa Ramirez was diagnosed with ovarian cancer when she was in college. Today she and her kids get their health care through the Affordable Care Act. But child advocates say a repeal of that law could jeopardize the program that covers her children. Will Stone/KJZZ hide caption

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Will Stone/KJZZ

Arizona Children Could Lose Health Coverage Under Obamacare Repeal

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Melissa Morris outside her home in Sterling, Colo. She quit using heroin in 2012, and now relies on the drug Suboxone to stay clean. She's also been helping to find treatment for some of the neighbors she used to sell drugs to. Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

Rural Colorado's Opioid Connections Might Hold Clues To Better Treatment

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A large collage decorates a wall of one exam room at the Haight Ashbury Free Medical Clinic in San Francisco, Calif. Dr. David Smith, founder of the clinic, says patients and staff call the mural the Psychedelic Wall of Fame. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Stanford bioengineering professor Manu Prakash looked to a children's toy to create a hand-powered centrifuge for processing blood tests. Kurt Hickman /Stanford University hide caption

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Kurt Hickman /Stanford University

Children's Whirligig Toy Inspires a Low-Cost Laboratory Test

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Keishla Mojica, 23, lives in Cuagas, Puerto Rico. She was infected with Zika virus while pregnant and expects to give birth in early January. Carmen Heredia Rodriguez/KHN hide caption

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Carmen Heredia Rodriguez/KHN

Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles has been penalized in all three years since the creation of a Medicare program to reduce patient-safety issues in hospitals. FG/Bauer-Griffin/GC Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Knowing Someone Who Faced Discrimination May Affect Blood Pressure

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Third-year dental student Alex Dolbik checks the oral health of a patient at the Refugee Health Clinic in San Antonio. Wendy Rigby/Texas Public Radio hide caption

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Wendy Rigby/Texas Public Radio

In Texas, Students Help Provide Health Care For Refugees

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The mumps virus is on the loose. Cases are popping up in Arkansas, Iowa and Illinois. Alissa Eckert/CDC hide caption

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Alissa Eckert/CDC

Mumps Bump: Cases Rise In Iowa, Illinois And Arkansas

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Researchers have found marijuana metabolites in the urine of babies who were exposed to adult marijuana use. deux/Corbis/Getty Images hide caption

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Doctors Say Parents Shouldn't Smoke Pot Around Kids

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Florida Department of Health workers package a urine test, part of the state's effort to provide free Zika tests to pregnant women. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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After reaching adulthood, a mosquito emerges from the water looking for trouble. Courtesy of Andrew Hammond hide caption

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Courtesy of Andrew Hammond

To Fight Malaria, Scientists Try Genetic Engineering To Wipe Out Mosquitoes

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Image Source/Getty Images

Life Expectancy In U.S. Drops For First Time In Decades, Report Finds

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Kara Salim, 26, got out of the Marion County, Indiana, jail in 2015 with a history of domestic-violence charges, bipolar disorder and alcoholism — and without Medicaid coverage. As a result, she couldn't afford the fees for court-ordered therapy. Philip Scott Andrews for KHN hide caption

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Philip Scott Andrews for KHN

Signed Out Of Prison But Not Signed Up For Health Insurance

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Anti-Zika advice applied to a wall in front of a housing project in the Puerta de Tierras section of San Juan, Puerto Rico. This public health message was part of an island-wide effort to stem the spread of Zika. Angel Valentin/Getty Images hide caption

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Under the Affordable Care Act, insurers are required to cover birth control with no copay. It's unclear what will happen to coverage if the act is repealed or amended. B. Boissonnet/BSIP/Getty Images hide caption

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Education may help brains cope with cognitive decline, and treatments for high blood pressure and other health problems may decrease dementia risk. Alfred Pasieka/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Dementia Risk Declines, And Education May Be One Reason Why

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