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Health News From NPR

Dr. Leana Wen, Baltimore City health commissioner, visits a newly opened Safe Streets center in the Sandtown-Winchester neighborhood in West Baltimore. Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

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Lesson Learned For Baltimore's Health Commissioner: 'I Like A Fight'
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Key Haven, a Florida neighborhood about a mile east of Key West, is where a test of Oxitec's genetically engineered mosquitoes might take place later this year. Some neighbors have strongly dissented — at public meetings and via yard signs. Nancy Klingener/WLRN hide caption

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Florida Keys Weigh Options For Battling Mosquitoes And Zika
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Suicide rates for women and girls are on the rise. Eva Bee/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Suicide Rates Climb In U.S., Especially Among Adolescent Girls
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Daniel Fung/iStockphoto
Life Expectancy Drops For White Women, Increases For Black Men
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Angelica Pereira feeds her daughter Luiza, who was born with microcephaly, at her mother's house in Santa Cruz do Capibaribe, Brazil. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Zika Virus Can Cause Brain Defects In Babies, CDC Confirms
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Inyan Pedersen, 34, with her son Knowledge. Doctors scheduled Pedersen to deliver her two younger children by C-sections because the closest birthing center is two hours away. Misha Friedman for KHN and NPR hide caption

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Navajo miners work at the Kerr-McGee uranium mine at Cove, Ariz., on May 7, 1953. AP hide caption

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For The Navajo Nation, Uranium Mining's Deadly Legacy Lingers
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Safe Streets outreach coordinator Dante Barksdale says right after a shooting, the injured almost always talk. "Some of them want revenge, right then and there," he says. "Some of them are afraid. They're thinking about their brother or their homeboy. 'Is my man all right? He was with me!' They're real vulnerable. They got questions." Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Baltimore Sees Hospitals As Key To Breaking A Cycle Of Violence
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Opana pills, seen in 2010, before Endo Pharmaceuticals changed the formula in a move intended to deter abuse. Tom Walker/Flickr hide caption

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How A Painkiller Designed To Deter Abuse Helped Spark An HIV Outbreak
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"Everyone that's in there right now has probably done it," Clyde Polly says about Opana injections at his home. Seth Herald for NPR hide caption

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Inside A Small Brick House At The Heart Of Indiana's Opioid Crisis
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An oil field truck is used to make a transfer at oil-storage tanks in Williston, N.D., in 2014. It was atop tanks like these that oil worker Dustin Bergsing, 21, was found dead. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Mysterious Death Reveals Risk In Federal Oil Field Rules
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Annette Elizabeth Allen for NPR
A Crisis With Scant Data: States Move To Count Drug-Dependent Babies
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More than 20,000 babies in the U.S. were born with congenital rubella syndrome during an outbreak of rubella in 1964-65. A vaccine developed in 1969 helped curb the virus's spread but hasn't eliminated it worldwide. Public Health Image Library/CDC hide caption

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Lessons From Rubella Suggest Zika's Impact Could Linger
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Standing water and abandoned tires make Houston's Fifth Ward hospitable for mosquitoes. Courtesy of Anna Grove Photography hide caption

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Houston Prepares Now For Zika's Potential Arrival This Summer
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When it comes to chronic pain relief, the CDC is asking doctors and patients to think about alternatives to opioids. Robin Nelson/Zumapress.com/Corbis hide caption

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CDC Has Advice For Primary Care Doctors About Opioids
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A doctor walks through a hallway at the Centro Medico trauma center in San Juan, Puerto Rico, in 2013. A medical exodus has been taking place for a decade in the Caribbean territory as doctors and nurses flee for the U.S. mainland, seeking higher salaries and better reimbursements from insurers. Ricardo Arduengo/AP hide caption

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SOS: Puerto Rico Is Losing Doctors, Leaving Patients Stranded
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Paramedic Phil Salamone carries naloxone, a drug used to reverse an opioid overdose. Melissa Block/NPR hide caption

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A Small Town Wonders What To Do When Heroin Is 'Everywhere'
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Katherine Streeter for NPR
Hospitals Adapt ERs To Meet Patient Demand For Routine Care
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