A pair of studies show declines in opioid use by young people, including prescription use, intentional misuse and accidental poisonings. Gabe Souza/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images hide caption

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Gabe Souza/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images

Birth control pills actually may be safer for teenagers than for older women, a study finds. BSIP/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/UIG/Getty Images

Over-The-Counter Birth Control Pills Would Be Safe For Teens, Researchers Say

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Opana ER was reformulated to make it harder to crush and snort, but people abusing the drug turned to injecting it instead. And that fueled an HIV outbreak in Indiana. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Michael Botticelli, former director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy, testifies during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on attacking America's epidemic of heroin and prescription drug abuse. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Former Drug Czar Says GOP Health Bill Would Cut Access To Addiction Treatment

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About 35 percent of the patients at this clinic in York, Pa., receive Medicaid. The clinic offers STD testing, cancer screening and contraception services as well as abortion services. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

Public Clinics Fear Federal Cuts To Planned Parenthood Would Strand Patients

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A computer analysis found that people with the same name were more likely to share similar expressions around their eyes and mouths, areas of the face that are easier to adjust. Courtesy of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology hide caption

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Courtesy of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

The Federico F. Peña Southwest Family Health Center opened in 2016 to serve a low-income community in Denver. The clinic and its parent system, Denver Health, have benefited financially from the Affordable Care Act and its expansion of Medicaid. John Daley / Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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John Daley / Colorado Public Radio

Threat Of Obamacare Repeal Leaves Community Health Centers In Limbo

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Dr. Farooq Habib (left) and Dr. Muhammad Tauseef share an office at Los Barrios Unidos Community Clinic in Dallas. They're both from Pakistan and have both worked as pediatricians in medically underserved areas in the U.S. Lauren Silverman/KERA hide caption

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Lauren Silverman/KERA

Trump Travel Ban Spotlights U.S. Dependence On Foreign-Born Doctors

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Under the old rules, the CDC's authority was primarily limited to detaining travelers entering the U.S. or crossing state lines. With the new rules, the CDC would be able to detain people anywhere in the country, without getting approval from state and local officials. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

CDC Seeks Controversial New Quarantine Powers To Stop Outbreaks

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Vanessa Ramirez was diagnosed with ovarian cancer when she was in college. Today she and her kids get their health care through the Affordable Care Act. But child advocates say a repeal of that law could jeopardize the program that covers her children. Will Stone/KJZZ hide caption

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Will Stone/KJZZ

Arizona Children Could Lose Health Coverage Under Obamacare Repeal

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Melissa Morris outside her home in Sterling, Colo. She quit using heroin in 2012, and now relies on the drug Suboxone to stay clean. She's also been helping to find treatment for some of the neighbors she used to sell drugs to. Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

Rural Colorado's Opioid Connections Might Hold Clues To Better Treatment

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A large collage decorates a wall of one exam room at the Haight Ashbury Free Medical Clinic in San Francisco, Calif. Dr. David Smith, founder of the clinic, says patients and staff call the mural the Psychedelic Wall of Fame. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Stanford bioengineering professor Manu Prakash looked to a children's toy to create a hand-powered centrifuge for processing blood tests. Kurt Hickman /Stanford University hide caption

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Kurt Hickman /Stanford University

Children's Whirligig Toy Inspires a Low-Cost Laboratory Test

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Keishla Mojica, 23, lives in Cuagas, Puerto Rico. She was infected with Zika virus while pregnant and expects to give birth in early January. Carmen Heredia Rodriguez/KHN hide caption

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Carmen Heredia Rodriguez/KHN