Public Health : Shots - Health News When the neighborhood, town or nation is the patient, we're on the case. Find out about health in the community and around the globe. We round up the latest on prevention, disease outbreaks and the world's response to health crises.

A Houston resident walks through waist-deep water while evacuating her home after severe flooding following Hurricane Harvey in north Houston. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

After Hurricane Katrina, Many People Found New Strength

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A smokestack rises in the background over the East Houston community of Manchester, Texas, where the air was heavy with what smelled like gasoline after Hurricane Harvey in late August. The neighborhood is ringed by industrial sites. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Air Pollution From Industry Plagues Houston In Harvey's Wake

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Smoke plumes rise from the Rice Ridge Fire in August, behind Montana's Seeley Lake Elementary School, in Seeley Lake, Mont. Eric Whitney/MTPR hide caption

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Eric Whitney/MTPR

Montanans Pitch In To Bring Clean Air To Smoky Classrooms

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Third-year students at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine learn how to trim crowns and prep a tooth for a crown. They're also learning to deal with the aftereffects, studying alternatives to opioids for pain relief. Jessica Cheung/NPR hide caption

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Jessica Cheung/NPR

Dental Schools Add An Urgent Lesson: Think Twice About Prescribing Opioids

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The shelter at Houston's Convention Center, seen here Aug. 29, isn't equipped to provide medication-assisted treatment for opioid abuse. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Houston Methadone Clinics Reopen After Harvey's Flooding

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Dr. Ruth Berggren stands outside Charity Hospital in New Orleans in 2005, where she had earlier cared for patients during Hurricane Katrina. Cheryl Gerber/AP hide caption

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Cheryl Gerber/AP

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center had 528 patients in the hospital as Harvey hit. A team of about 1,000 people tended to them and their families until reinforcements arrived Monday. Courtesy of MD Anderson Cancer Center hide caption

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Courtesy of MD Anderson Cancer Center

An 'Army Of People' Helps Houston Cancer Patients Get Treatment

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Parts of Houston remain flooded, but most hospitals are up and running, according to Darrell Pile, CEO of the Southeast Texas Regional Advisory Council, which manages the catastrophic medical operations center in Houston. Marcus Yam/LA Times/Getty Images hide caption

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Marcus Yam/LA Times/Getty Images

In Houston, Most Hospitals 'Up And Fully Functional'

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Evacuees fill up cots at a shelter set up inside the George R. Brown Convention Center in Houston, Texas. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Health Issues Stack Up In Houston As Harvey Evacuees Seek Shelter

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Needles at the Alaska AIDS Assistance Association syringe exchange in Anchorage. Zachariah Hughes/Alaska Public Media hide caption

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Zachariah Hughes/Alaska Public Media

Syringe Exchange Program Aims To Slow Hepatitis C Infections In Alaska

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Rosendo Gil, a family support worker with the Imperial County, Calif., home visiting program, has visited Blas Lopez and his fiancée Lluvia Padilla dozens of times since their daughter was born three years ago. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Overdoses from heroin and other opioids have led six states to declare public health emergencies. Marianne Williams/Getty Images hide caption

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Marianne Williams/Getty Images

From Alaska To Florida, States Respond To Opioid Crisis With Emergency Declarations

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After a briefing Tuesday on the opioid crisis, President Trump remarked on its severity but did not offer many specifics on tackling the problem. Two days later, he said his administration would declare a national emergency. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Some States Say Declaring An Emergency Has Helped In The Opioid Fight

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New research found a link between how puppies interact with their mothers and how they perform in guide dog training. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

Coddled Puppies Make Poor Guide Dogs, Study Suggests

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Shannon McGrath, pictured with her son Rayder, says it has been a lot easier to make her medical appointments recently, thanks to help from a "patient navigator" — assigned to her by Kaiser Permanente — who arranged McGrath's transportation. Kristian Foden-Vencil/OPB hide caption

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Kristian Foden-Vencil/OPB

Your ZIP Code Might Be As Important To Health As Your Genetic Code

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The Haven for Hope, a homeless shelter in San Antonio, is one of dozens of locations around 20 South Texas counties where people are now being tested for latent tuberculosis infections. Wendy Rigby/Texas Public Radio hide caption

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Wendy Rigby/Texas Public Radio

South Texas Fights Tuberculosis One Blood Test At A Time

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Andrea Towson used heroin for more than three decades. After a near-death experience with fentanyl, she sought help. Shelby Knowles/NPR hide caption

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Shelby Knowles/NPR

'That Fentanyl — That's Death': A Story Of Recovery In Baltimore

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Tara Lang was pregnant with her daughter when her fiance was killed in a motorcycle crash. A pregnancy center in Metairie, La., helped her sign up for Medicaid coverage. Jessica Rosgaard/WWNO hide caption

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Jessica Rosgaard/WWNO

How Crisis Pregnancy Center Clients Rely On Medicaid

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