Four sheep cloned from the same genetic material as Dolly roam the paddocks in Nottingham, England. The University of Nottingham hide caption

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'Sister Clones' Of Dolly The Sheep Are Alive And Kicking

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Kathy Snook, Terri Anderson and Gary Snook traveled from Montana to Dr. Forest Tennant's office in West Covina, Calif. Corin Cates-Carney/Montana Public Radio hide caption

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A demonstration dose of Suboxone film, which is placed under the tongue. It is used to treat opioid addiction. M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

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Maryland Switches Opioid Treatments, And Some Patients Cry Foul

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Ovarian tissue after the thaw — ready for reimplantation. Courtesy of The Infertility Center of St. Louis hide caption

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Twin Sisters Try To Get Pregnant With Ovaries They Froze In 2009

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Breasts deemed "dense" in a mammogram tend to have less fatty tissue and more connective tissue, breast ducts and glands, doctors say. About 40 percent of women between the ages of 40 and 74 have dense breasts. Lester Lefkowitz/Getty Images hide caption

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Allan Aarslev, a police superintendent in Aarhus, became part of the effort to make young Muslims feel like they have a future in Denmark. Scanpix Denmark/USAScanpix/Sipa hide caption

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Katherine Streeter for KQED

Frustrated You Can't Find A Therapist? They're Frustrated, Too

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Taylor Callery/Ikon Images/Getty Images

'Unbroken Brain' Explains Why 'Tough' Treatment Doesn't Help Drug Addicts

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This synthetic stingray is made of gold, silicone and live muscle cells from a rat. Scientists use pulses of light to guide its propulsion. Karaghen Hudson and Michael Rosnach/Science hide caption

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Synthetic Stingray May Lead To A Better Artificial Heart

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In states that made medical marijuana legal, prescriptions for a range of drugs covered by Medicare dropped. Chris Hondros/Getty Images hide caption

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Women go through a lot in the delivery of a healthy baby. But in most cases, doctors say, an episiotomy needn't be part of the experience. Marc Romanelli/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Mary Mullens, age 93, in her room at Edgewood Summit Retirement Community in Charleston, W.Va. Mullens is a patient of Dr. Todd Goldberg, one of only 36 geriatricians in the state. Kara Lofton/West Virginia Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Few Young Doctors Are Training To Care For U.S. Elderly

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When mental health professionals don't take insurance, only the wealthy can afford their help. Joe Houghton/Getty Images hide caption

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How Therapy Became A Hobby Of The Wealthy, Out Of Reach For Those In Need

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