A 1980 letter published in the New England Journal of Medicine was later widely cited as evidence that long-term use of opioid painkillers such as oxycodone was safe, even though the letter did not back up that claim. Education Images/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Education Images/UIG via Getty Images

Doctor Who Wrote 1980 Letter On Painkillers Regrets That It Fed The Opioid Crisis

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When the neurons that release the neurotransmitter dopamine die, people develop Parkinson's disease. Roger J. Bick &/Brian J. Poindexter / UT-Houston/Science Source hide caption

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Roger J. Bick &/Brian J. Poindexter / UT-Houston/Science Source

Brain Cell Transplants Are Being Tested Once Again For Parkinson's

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A change in guidelines for breast cancer surgery has resulted in fewer women having to undergo repeat surgeries. Martin J Cook/Getty Images hide caption

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Martin J Cook/Getty Images

Fewer Women Need To Undergo Repeat Surgery After Lumpectomy

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Juanita Milton, who suffers from COPD, uses her nebulizer with albuterol sulfate at her home in Live Oak, Texas. Carolyn Van Houten for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Carolyn Van Houten for Kaiser Health News

Many COPD Patients Struggle To Pay For Each Breath

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(From left to right) Mackenzie Stamper, Adrian Rodriguez and Luke Ryan attend weekly Suzuki violin lessons with instructor Sara Johnson, part of a training program called MILEStone, or Music Impacting Language Expertise. Andrea Hsu/NPR hide caption

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Andrea Hsu/NPR

Using Music And Rhythm To Help Kids With Grammar And Language

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Most of the people in a choir at Ryerson University in Toronto have joined a study testing how practicing music might help people with hearing loss handle noisy environments better. Andrea Hsu/NPR hide caption

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Andrea Hsu/NPR

'Like Brain Boot Camp': Using Music To Ease Hearing Loss

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A 4-year-old regulation in New York state requires doctors and hospitals to treat sepsis using a protocol that some researchers now question. Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Getty Images/iStockphoto

Are State Rules For Treating Sepsis Really Saving Lives?

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Charmayne Healy (left) and Miranda Kirk (right), co-founders of the Aaniiih Nakoda Anti-Drug Movement, have helped Melinda Healy (center) with their peer-support programs. Nora Saks/MTPR hide caption

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Nora Saks/MTPR

2 Sisters Try To Tackle Drug Use At A Montana Indian Reservation

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A scientist holds a bioprosthetic mouse ovary made of gelatin with tweezers. Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine hide caption

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Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Scientists One Step Closer To 3-D-Printed Ovaries To Treat Infertility

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Secretary of Health and Human Services Tom Price contradicted his agency's online information about the efficacy of medication-assisted treatment for opioid addiction. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Ann Mazuca has diabetes and glaucoma that can be aggravated by high blood pressure. The support shown by clinic staff at the University Family Health Center Southeast, in San Antonio, helps her do what's needed to reduce hypertension, she says. "The fact that they care makes me care." Wendy Rigby/TPR hide caption

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Wendy Rigby/TPR

A saliva test allowed scientists to accurately predict how long concussion symptoms would last in children. technotr/Getty Images hide caption

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technotr/Getty Images

Spit Test May Reveal The Severity Of A Child's Concussion

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Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore opened a six-bed urgent care center next to its infusion center a couple of years ago. Of the patients who land there, about 80 percent are discharged home afterward, rather than needing admission to the hospital. Courtesy of Johns Hopkins Medicine hide caption

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Courtesy of Johns Hopkins Medicine

It turns out it's difficult to get people to adhere to the various dietary restrictions that come with participating in a fasting study. Xsandra/Getty Images hide caption

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Xsandra/Getty Images

Brian Vastag suffers from myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome, or ME/CFS for short. He is part of an NIH study of the disease, which is commonly called chronic fatigue syndrome. Miriam Tucker for NPR hide caption

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Miriam Tucker for NPR