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When a baby is born by cesarean section, she misses out on Mom's microbes in the birth canal. Sarah Small/Getty Images hide caption

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Kelli Fabick of Ellisville, Mo., held her mother's Australian silky terrier, Zoey, as veterinarian Sarah Hormuth gave the dog a flu shot last April. The dog flu strain H3N2 is now circulating in more than two dozen U.S. states. St. Louis Post-Dispatch/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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The routines that students learn at Dance for PD classes in Venice, Calif., can be quite challenging, instructors say. Courtesy of Joe Lambie and Laura Karlin hide caption

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In researching their book, Caren Zucker and John Donvan tracked down Donald Gray Triplett (center), the first person officially diagnosed with autism. Now in his 80s, Triplett has had a long, happy life, Donvan says, maybe partly because his hometown embraced him from the beginning as " 'odd, but really, really smart.' " Courtesy of Penguin Random House hide caption

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Amy Thomson holds 2-month-old Isla in Seattle Children's Hospital in early 2014. When the Thomson family learned Isla's heart was failing, they took an air ambulance from Butte, Mont., to Seattle to get medical care. Courtesy of the Thomson family hide caption

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Nexium is one of several popular medications for heartburn and acid reflux called proton-pump inhibitors. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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The stomach of Oetzi, who was mummified in ice, was home to bacteria that scientists were able to identify. The same species lives in the gut of many modern humans. EURAC/Marion Lafogler hide caption

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Treatments

Stomach Of Ancient Iceman Held Microbes Like Ours

Scientists analyzed the tummy of a 5,300-year-old ice mummy and found bacteria that many modern humans still carry.

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The Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, which causes MERS, is one of the microbes that has sparked research controversy. NIAID/CDC hide caption

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Cheryl Woolnough, director of training at Patriot PAWS in Rockwall, Texas, works with Papi, a Labrador retriever. Lauren Silverman/KERA News hide caption

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The upshot from a study of more than 75,000 low-risk births is that "childbirth in the United States is very safe regardless of where you decide to do it," says Dr. Michael Greene, who directs obstetrics at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Photofusion/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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