The National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine recommends that most adults get about 600 international units of vitamin D per day through food or supplements, increasing that dose to 800 IUs per day for those 70 or older. essgee51/Flickr hide caption

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essgee51/Flickr

A Bit More Vitamin D Might Help Prevent Colds And Flu

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A doctor at a Boston Medical Center clinic counsels a patient who has become addicted to opioid painkillers, and wants help kicking the habit. Addiction specialists say drugs like suboxone, which mitigates withdrawal symptoms, can greatly improve his odds of success. Suzanne Kreiter/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Suzanne Kreiter/Boston Globe via Getty Images

Sixty-three percent of women who used the Paxman cooling device said they used wigs or head wraps to cover up hair loss, compared to 100 percent of women who didn't try cooling. Courtesy of Baylor College of Medicine hide caption

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Courtesy of Baylor College of Medicine

Cooling Cap May Limit Chemo Hair Loss In Women With Breast Cancer

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Scientists have genetically engineered mice (but not this cute one) to be resistant to the addictive effects of cocaine. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

A Brain Tweak Lets Mice Abstain From Cocaine

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After A Stroke At 33, A Writer Relies On Journals To Piece Together Her Own Story

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Jay Zimmerman (left) and his father, Buddy, in July 2016. Buddy, who was also a veteran, passed away last September. Courtesy of Jay Zimmerman hide caption

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Courtesy of Jay Zimmerman

Veteran Teaches Therapists How To Talk About Gun Safety When Suicide's A Risk

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The hemoglobin A1C test for blood sugar, a standard assay for diabetes, may not perform as well in people with sickle cell trait, a study finds. fotostorm/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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fotostorm/Getty Images/iStockphoto

The A1C Blood Sugar Test May Be Less Accurate In African-Americans

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Keith Negley for NPR

Prion Test For Rare, Fatal Brain Disease Helps Families Cope

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Heat and steam from your shower or shave can rob medicine of its potency long before the drug's expiration date. Angela Cappetta/Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Cappetta/Getty Images

When Old Medicine Goes Bad

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A color-enhanced spiral CT image of the chest shows a large cancerous mass (in yellow) in the left upper lobe. Medical Body Scans/Science Source hide caption

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Medical Body Scans/Science Source

Lung Cancer Screening Program Finds A Lot That's Not Cancer

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The micromotor device may someday be used to deliver antibiotics to the stomach. Angewandte Chemie International Edition hide caption

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Angewandte Chemie International Edition

This Tiny Submarine Cruises Inside A Stomach To Deliver Drugs

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A self-portrait taken by Cajal in his library when he was in his 30s. Courtesy Instituto Cajal del Consjo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Madrid hide caption

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Courtesy Instituto Cajal del Consjo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Madrid

Art Exhibition Celebrates Drawings By The Founder Of Modern Neuroscience

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A vial of injectable steroids from the New England Compounding Center seen at the Tennessee Department of Health in Nashville in 2012. Kristin M. Hall/AP hide caption

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Kristin M. Hall/AP

Victims Of Contaminated Steroids Still Hurting: 'My Life's Upside-Down'

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Siphiwe Baleka (left) says he gained 15 pounds when he first started driving a truck; food was comfort and exercise was tough to come by. Trucking, he says, is "the most unhealthy occupation in America." Alex Smith hide caption

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Alex Smith

Athlete-Turned-Trucker Works To Improve Truckers' Health

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Research with living systems is never simple, scientists say, so there are many possible sources of variation in any experiment, ranging from the animals and cells to the details of lab technique. Tom Werner/Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Werner/Getty Images

What Does It Mean When Cancer Findings Can't Be Reproduced?

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Migraine headaches are one example of a chronic illness that typically doesn't respond to quick fixes. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

For Many People, Medical Care Works Best When It's Incremental

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