An aggressive marketing campaign has made the EpiPen the go-to drug for treating anaphylaxis. Mark Zaleski/AP hide caption

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EpiPen Manufacturer Says It Will Help With Out-Of-Pocket Costs

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Abraham Vidaurre, 12, checks his arm after receiving an HPV shot in Corpus Christi, Texas. The vaccine is recommended for 11- and 12-year-old boys and girls. Matthew Busch/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The condition known as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, or HCM, is inherited and can be a killer. But some of the genetic mutations once thought linked to the illness are actually harmless, geneticists say. Afton Almaraz/Getty Images hide caption

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Study Of Sudden Cardiac Death Exposes Limits Of Genetic Testing

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Scientists Engineer An Opioid That May Reduce Pain With Less Risk

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Hearing Officer Jim Teal presides over a session of Early Intervention Family Drug Court in Sacramento, Calif., in March. The county program helps keep families together — and saves taxpayers $7 million annually, Sacramento County officials say. Robert Durell for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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California Court Helps Kids By Healing Parents' Addictions

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Alexander Naddour, of the U.S. men's gymnastics team, bears the circular mark of cupping on his right arm as he prepares to compete on the pommel horse at the Rio de Janeiro Olympics on August 6. Alex Livesey/Getty Images hide caption

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A poll of psychiatrists about the mental fitness of Barry Goldwater, Republican nominee for president in 1964, led to the creation of a rule that discourages doctors from public diagnoses. William Lovelace/Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Scientists with the international scientific collaboration known as the "Walk Again Project" use noninvasive brain-machine interfaces in their efforts to reawaken damaged fibers in the spinal cord. AASDAP and Lente Viva Filmes, São Paulo, Brazil/Nature hide caption

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Christian Choe, Zach Rosenthal, and Maria Filsinger Interrante, who call themselves Team Lyseia, strategize about experiments to test their new antibiotics. Linda A. Cicero/Stanford News /Courtesy of Stanford University hide caption

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Young Inventors Work On Secret Proteins To Thwart Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

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Colored scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Escherichia coli bacteria (green) taken from the small intestine of a child. E. coli are rod-shaped bacteria that are part of the normal flora of the human gut. Stephanie Schuller/Science Source hide caption

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The underwater construction skills of the caddis fly larva have caught the interest of bioengineers. The larva tapes and glues pebbles together to form a sturdy protective case. Josh Cassidy/KQED hide caption

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In this file photo, a professor holds a tray of stem cells at the University of Connecticut. The NIH plans to lift a moratorium on funding studies using human stem cells in animal embryos. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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The Chimera Quandary: Is It Ethical To Create Hybrid Embryos?

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Even when results from studies involving children are available, they frequently aren't published in medical journals. Cultura RM Exclusive/Getty Images hide caption

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Medical Studies Involving Children Often Go Unpublished

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A makeshift memorial continues to grow outside the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Fla., on July 11, one month after the mass shooting at the club. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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The Costs Of The Pulse Nightclub Shooting

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Women often save up questions for an annual office visit that they think don't warrant a sick visit to the doctor during the year, research finds. Tim Pannell/Fuse/Getty Images hide caption

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