Treatments : Shots - Health News Here you can find out how the practice of medicine is changing. We pull together the latest research on medical tests, drugs and other therapies.

The notion that every dog or cat should be neutered at 6 months isn't based on evidence, says veterinarian Brennen McKenzie, author of The SkeptVet blog. It depends on the breed and other factors. Talk to your vet, he advises, about pros, cons and timing. katoosha/iStockphoto/Getty Images hide caption

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A patient is evacuated from Baptist Hospitals of Southeast Texas in Beaumont, Texas, on Thursday. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Texas Expedites Help From Out-Of-State Health Care Providers

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Scientists have created a treatment in which genetically modified T cells, shown in blue, can attack cancer cells, shown in red. Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source hide caption

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Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source

FDA Approves First Gene Therapy For Leukemia

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William Scott (right) and his wife, Teresa, arrived at DaVita Med Center Dialysis in Houston on Tuesday morning, after missing William's appointment on Monday. "It's just good he got in here," she says. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

'This Is Surreal': Houston Dialysis Center Struggles To Treat Patients

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Avi Ofer for NPR

How Moldy Hay And Sick Cows Led To A Lifesaving Drug

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Physical therapy as well as cognitive therapy are part of a promising approach to managing chronic pain without drugs. Hero Images/Getty Images hide caption

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After surgeons removed a tumor from Dan Fabbio's brain, they gave him his saxophone — to see whether he'd retained his ability to play. A year after his surgery, Fabbio is back to work full time as a music teacher. YouTube/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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YouTube/Screenshot by NPR

This Music Teacher Played His Saxophone While In Brain Surgery

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A U.S. Marine from the 1st Battalion, 8th Marines, Alpha Company looks out as an evening storm gathers above an outpost near Kunjak, in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province. Finbarr O'Reilly/Reuters/Viking hide caption

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Finbarr O'Reilly/Reuters/Viking

A Retired Marine And A Photojournalist Confront War's 'Invisible Injuries'

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Across the state of Maine, the number of prescriptions for painkillers is dropping. But some patients who have chronic pain say they need high doses of the medication to be able to function. Fanatic Studio/Getty Images hide caption

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Intent On Reversing Its Opioid Epidemic, A State Limits Prescriptions

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Hospital emergency departments are tasked with saving the lives of people who overdose on opioids. Clinicians and researchers hope that more can be done during the hospital encounter to connect people with treatment. FangXiaNuo/Getty Images hide caption

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This sequence of images shows the development of embryos formed after eggs were injected with both CRISPR, a gene-editing tool, and sperm from a donor with a genetic mutation known to cause cardiomyopathy. OHSU hide caption

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OHSU

Exclusive: Inside The Lab Where Scientists Are Editing DNA In Human Embryos

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The maternal mortality rate in the U.S. is the highest among affluent nations. Researchers believe that with better education, postpartum nurses could help mothers identify life-threatening complications. Mart Klein/Getty Images hide caption

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Many Nurses Lack Knowledge Of Health Risks To Mothers After Childbirth

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In her book The Virginia State Colony For Epileptics And Feebleminded, poet Molly McCully Brown explores themes of disability, eugenics and faith. Kristin Teston/Persea hide caption

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Kristin Teston/Persea

Poet Imagines Life Inside A 1910 Institution That Eugenics Built

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A vaccine against heroin wouldn't be like the measles vaccine that you receive once for a lifetime of immunity, say scientists working on it. Multiple shots per year would likely be required, and it would be specific to just heroin and morphine. kimberrywood/Getty Images hide caption

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A 'Vaccine For Addiction' Is No Simple Fix

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Finding some change in the blood of an Alzheimer's patient that accurately reflects the damaging changes in the brain has been tough. utah778//iStockphoto/Getty Images hide caption

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Judge Lewis Gregory, head of the city court in Greenwood, Ind., began allowing drug court participants to begin taking Vivitrol after meeting with an Alkermes sales representative. Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

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Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media

To Grow Market Share, A Drugmaker Pitches Its Product To Judges

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The first sign of successful in vitro fertilization, after co-injection of a gene-correcting enzyme and sperm from a donor with a genetic mutation known to cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Courtesy of OHSU hide caption

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Courtesy of OHSU

Scientists Precisely Edit DNA In Human Embryos To Fix A Disease Gene

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