Shots - Health News

Shots - Health NewsShots - Health News

Health News From NPR

One Silicon Valley startup that encouraged its employees to think about work 24/7 found they missed market signals, tanked deals and became too irritable to build crucial working relationships. Hill Street Studios/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Hill Street Studios/Blend Images/Getty Images
Many Grouchy, Error-Prone Workers Just Need More Sleep
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/475287202/475696100" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Stacey McHoul said she ran out of psychiatric medicine a few days after leaving jail last year and soon began using heroin again. Courtesy of Kaiser Health News hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Kaiser Health News

Earlier this week, NIH temporarily halted work in the cell therapy lab of Dr. Steven Rosenberg, chief of surgery at the National Cancer Institute, pending a review of safety standards there. Courtesy of National Cancer Institute hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of National Cancer Institute
Task Force Calls For More Safety Oversight At NIH Research Hospital
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/475045732/475161653" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Marcus Butt/Ikon Images/Getty Images
Electric Currents And An 'Emotional Awakening' For One Man With Autism
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/475112703/475165887" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

After eggs of the whipworm are swallowed, they hatch in the small intestine. Though troublesome for most, they might help some people feel better. Lester V. Bergman/Corbis hide caption

toggle caption Lester V. Bergman/Corbis

Ian Burkhart prepares for a training session in Columbus, Ohio. To move muscles in Burkhart's hand, the system relies on electrodes implanted in his brain, a computer interface attached to his skull, and electrical stimulators wrapped around his forearm. Lee Powell/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Lee Powell/The Washington Post/Getty Images
Technology Helps A Paralyzed Man Transform Thought Into Movement
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/473821367/474120958" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The researchers were inspired by working with ultramarathoners, who can be sidelined by blisters despite years of training. These runners competed in the 2007 Badwater Ultramarathon in Death Valley, Calif. Chris Carlson/AP hide caption

toggle caption Chris Carlson/AP
iStockphoto
A Fitbit Saved His Life? Well, Maybe
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/473393761/473772725" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Cassandra Steptoe (center) rehearses a performance with fellow actresses as part of The Medea Project, in San Francisco. Steptoe wrote and performs an autobiographical monologue in the production about being HIV-positive. Farida Jhabvala Romero/KQED hide caption

toggle caption Farida Jhabvala Romero/KQED

Create Prosthetics' 3-D printers give anyone in the world access to a design operation in Lake Placid, N.Y., that, for $500, creates a personalized cover for a prosthetic device. David Sommerstein/NCPR hide caption

toggle caption David Sommerstein/NCPR
Fashionable Prostheses Trade Realistic Color For Personal Pizazz
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/472570478/472784850" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Dr. Alexis LaPietra (left) and Dr. Mark Rosenberg have developed a program that tries to treat emergency room patients' pain without using opioids, which pose fatal risks. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Hansi Lo Wang/NPR
No Joke: N.J. Hospital Uses Laughing Gas To Cut Down On Opioid Use
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/472640008/472640009" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Dr. Dorry Segev (right), of Johns Hopkins Medicine, led the team of doctors that transplanted an HIV-positive liver and kidney into two different HIV-positive patients this month. Johns Hopkins Medicine hide caption

toggle caption Johns Hopkins Medicine
New Source Of Transplant Organs For Patients With HIV: Others With HIV
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/472389956/472501076" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Fatty plaque (shown here in yellow) blocks about 60 percent of this coronary artery's width. The increasing thickness of artery walls is just one factor that can increase vulnerability to a heart attack or stroke. Prof. P.M. Motta/G. Macchiarelli, S.A. Nottola/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption Prof. P.M. Motta/G. Macchiarelli, S.A. Nottola/Science Source
Possible Heart Benefits Of Taking Estrogen Get Another Look
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/472161906/472442433" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Amanda Hensley with her daughter, Valencia. Hensley says several hospitals and clinics she contacted were reluctant to help her quit her opioid habit. "Nobody wants to touch a pregnant woman with an addiction issue." Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN hide caption

toggle caption Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN
Pregnant And Addicted: The Tough Road To Family Health
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/471580034/472105590" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Carolyn Rossi, a registered nurse at the Hospital of Central Connecticut, says the opioid epidemic has required nurses who used to specialize in care for infants gain insights into caring for addicted mothers, as well. Rusty Kimball/Courtesy of Hartford HealthCare hide caption

toggle caption Rusty Kimball/Courtesy of Hartford HealthCare
To Help Newborns Dependent On Opioids, Hospitals Rethink Mom's Role
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/471289969/472067242" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Doctors are trying to slowly wean Lexi from her dependence on methadone. She's just 2 weeks old. Under a doctor's advice, her mom took methadone while pregnant, to help kick a heroin habit. Kristin Espeland Gourlay/RIPR hide caption

toggle caption Kristin Espeland Gourlay/RIPR
Tiny Opioid Patients Need Help Easing Into Life
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/471279600/472035995" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Valeant Pharmaceuticals has been the focus of a congressional investigation into high drug prices. . Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images