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Daniel Craig plays James Bond in the film Casino Royale. Dramatis, a computer program, can detect suspense from this scene and rates it even higher as the plot thickens. MGM/United Artists/Sony/The Kobal Collection hide caption

itoggle caption MGM/United Artists/Sony/The Kobal Collection

This genetically modified yeast can convert sugar into powerful opioid drugs. Scientists working with the modified yeast strains are required to register them with the Drug Enforcement Administration and keep the yeast under lock and key. Courtesy of Christina Smolke/Stanford University hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Christina Smolke/Stanford University

We all get by better with a little help from our tunes. iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto

Rates of unintended pregnancy among young women in the military are about 50 percent higher than among young women in the general population, research suggests. iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto

A New York study found that getting medical students together with dementia patients and their families at museums to view, discuss and create art for 90 minutes made the students better communicators. Colin Hawkins/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Colin Hawkins/Getty Images

Louis Arevalo holds his Truvada pills at his home in Los Angeles. The drug can be over 90 percent effective at preventing spread of HIV. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

itoggle caption Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

The sea snail Conus magus looks harmless enough, but it packs a venomous punch that lets it paralyze and eat fish. A peptide modeled on the venom is a powerful painkiller, though sneaking it past the blood-brain barrier has proved hard. Courtesy of Jeanette Johnson and Scott Johnson hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Jeanette Johnson and Scott Johnson

A Yale University study analyzed the experience of 60 million Americans covered by traditional Medicare between 1999 and 2013, and found "jaw-dropping improvements in almost every area," the lead author says. Ann Cutting/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Ann Cutting/Getty Images

Giedre (left) and Tal Cohen in March 2013, while Giedre was still healthy. Since then, she's begun having symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. In Giedre's case, the illness is tied to a rare genetic mutation she inherited. Courtesy of Tal Cohen hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Tal Cohen