Christopher Milford in his apartment in East Boston, Mass. He quit abusing opioids after getting endocarditis three times. Jack Rodolico/NHPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jack Rodolico/NHPR

Doctors Consider Ethics Of Costly Heart Surgery For People Addicted To Opioids

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/520830183/520922510" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
chuwy/Getty Images

Ketamine For Severe Depression: 'How Do You Not Offer This Drug To People?'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/520169959/520862770" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A colored magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the brain of a 76-year-old patient with dementia shows the brain has atrophied and the dark brown fluid-filled spaces have become enlarged. Zephyr/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Zephyr/Science Source

Cancer Drug That Might Slow Parkinson's, Alzheimer's Headed For Bigger Tests

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/520170960/520301658" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Cancer patient John Krahne has delayed taking a prescribed cancer drug because it was too expensive. He walks near his home in Santa Rosa, Calif. Robert Durell for Kaiser Health News hide caption

toggle caption
Robert Durell for Kaiser Health News

Sometimes fast-acting chemotherapy can help slow an aggressive cancer — and give the slower-acting immunotherapies a chance to work. UIG Platinum/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
UIG Platinum/UIG via Getty Images

Old-Style Chemo Is Still A Mainstay In The Age Of Targeted Cancer Therapy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/519090620/519954309" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

German dictator Adolf Hitler gives a speech in October 1944. Author Norman Ohler says that Hitler's abuse of drugs increased "significantly" from the fall of 1941 until the winter of 1944. Keystone/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Keystone/Getty Images

Author Says Hitler Was 'Blitzed' On Cocaine And Opiates During The War

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/518986612/519044337" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Even if you don't get an annual pelvic exam, every woman age 21 to 65 who has a cervix should get a Pap smear every three to five years, federal health officials advise. Tetra Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Tetra Images/Getty Images

Are Routine Pelvic Exams A Must? Evidence Is Lacking, Task Force Says

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/518838706/519064022" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., is one of three GOP senators seeking an investigation into six-figure annual costs for drugs intended to treat rare diseases. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Brandon/AP

Trent Barton, a volunteer for the study looking at pressure inside the brain during space flights. Courtesy of David Ham hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of David Ham

Doctor Launches Vision Quest To Help Astronauts' Eyeballs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/518214299/518462058" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A new treatment may help reduce the itch of atopic dermatitis, which will reduce flare-ups. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Targeting The Immune System May Help Stop The Itch Of Eczema

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/517933633/517988202" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This computer-enhanced barium contrast X-ray shows colon cancer in red. Researchers have been trying to figure out what looks to be a decade-long rise in colon cancer among people younger than 50. Scott Camazine/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Scott Camazine/Science Source

Dr. Joel Funari performs some 300 tooth extractions annually at his private practice in Devon, Pa.. He's part of a group of dentists reassessing opioid prescribing guidelines in the state. Elana Gordon / WHYY hide caption

toggle caption
Elana Gordon / WHYY

Dentists Work To Ease Patients' Pain With Fewer Opioids

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/513865623/517305358" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Nancy Roach at a conference in 2016. She's long worked as a patient's advocate and recently teamed up with scientists to help improve the design of studies, as well as to improve clinical care. Andrew Wortmann/Courtesy of Fight Colorectal Cancer hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Wortmann/Courtesy of Fight Colorectal Cancer

Advice From Patients On A Study's Design Makes For Better Science

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/515226648/517086518" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Andie Vaught grasps a stress toy in the shape of a truck as she prepares to have blood drawn as part of a clinical trial for a Zika vaccine at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md., in November 2016. Allison Shelley/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Allison Shelley/The Washington Post/Getty Images