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Your Health Podcast: Diets And Dicey Insects

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Your Health Podcast: Diets And Dicey Insects

Your Health

Your Health Podcast: Diets And Dicey Insects

Your Health Podcast: Diets And Dicey Insects

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/136280467/136279330" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Claims that strawberries and other foods rich in antioxidants can reduce inflammation and pain aren't backed up by much research. Menahem Kahana/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Menahem Kahana/AFP/Getty Images

Claims that strawberries and other foods rich in antioxidants can reduce inflammation and pain aren't backed up by much research.

Menahem Kahana/AFP/Getty Images

On this week's podcast we're evaluating diets and debunking some grand claims about them. One question we had was about the benefits of an anti-inflammation diet. We also wondered why Consumer Reports would rank Jenny Craig as the best diet plan this year.

From the Icky Department, we looked at how a New Mexico man was infected with the plague, and the appearance of drug-resistant bacteria on bedbugs in Vancouver.

Plus, we'll discuss autism. The number of children diagnosed with autism keeps climbing, but no one knows whether that's because the disorder is more prevalent, or if we're just better at finding it. NPR's Jon Hamilton reports on a study that sought to find every child with autism in one South Korean community. The results were surprising.

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