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Your Health Podcast: Sunscreen Redo And Chocolate Milk Off The Menu

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Your Health Podcast: Sunscreen Redo And Chocolate Milk Off The Menu

Your Health

Your Health Podcast: Sunscreen Redo And Chocolate Milk Off The Menu

Your Health Podcast: Sunscreen Redo And Chocolate Milk Off The Menu

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/137252871/137232708" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Belmont Senior High School cafeteria manager Carol Avalos stocked a refrigerated case with milk cartons in the Los Angeles school's cafeteria last month. The chocolate milk on the top shelf will soon be a thing of the past. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

Belmont Senior High School cafeteria manager Carol Avalos stocked a refrigerated case with milk cartons in the Los Angeles school's cafeteria last month. The chocolate milk on the top shelf will soon be a thing of the past.

Damian Dovarganes/AP

This week's podcast is stuffed with food stories.

We talk about the best and worst fruits and vegetables when it comes to pesticide residues, according to the Environmental Working Group. The advocacy group identifies apples, celery and strawberries as being the worst, while pointing to onions, sweet corn and pineapples as the best.

We also discuss the Los Angeles School District's recent ban of chocolate milk from school lunches. And whether the Obama administration will consider screening for more E.coli strains in light of the recent outbreak of foodborne illness in Europe.

We chat about new rules from the FDA that will require makers of sunscreens to more clearly define how their products protect against ultraviolet rays. The rules, which take effect next summer, could lead to confusion, even for a lifeguard.

Plus, we'll hear a story about stem cell research that could potentially replace heart cells that are damaged or destroyed by heart disease.

To subscribe to the Your Health podcast, click here.