Dr. Cesar Barba (right), a family physician at the UMMA Community Clinic's Fremont Wellness Center in South Los Angeles, treats Lourdes Flores Valdez, 42, for her diabetes and other health issues. Maya Sugarman/KPCC hide caption

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Maya Sugarman/KPCC

Dr. Paul Turek, a urologist with clinics in San Francisco and Beverly Hills, says one group of friends who got vasectomies together, during the NCAA spring basketball tournament, seemed to recover more quickly than usual, and require fewer pain pills. April Dembosky/KQED hide caption

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April Dembosky/KQED

March Madness Vasectomies Encourage Guys To Take One For The Team

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The health insurance company Anthem has said the GOP bill would benefit both insurers and individuals. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Rep. Kevin Brady, R-Texas, says the latest version of the GOP bill would let states decide on required benefits. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Nearly two-thirds of cell mutations that cause cancer are caused by random error, a study found. Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source hide caption

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Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source

Cancer Is Partly Caused By Bad Luck, Study Finds

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House Speaker Paul Ryan is trying to rally Republican lawmakers to vote for the American Health Care Act. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

GOP Health Bill Changes Could Kill Protections For Those With Pre-Existing Conditions

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Brookings Papers on Economic Activity

The Forces Driving Middle-Aged White People's 'Deaths Of Despair'

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Of the million or so Americans a year who get sepsis, roughly 300,000 die. Unfortunately, many treatments for the condition have looked promising in small, preliminary studies, only to fail in follow-up research. Reptile8488/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Reptile8488/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Doctor Turns Up Possible Treatment For Deadly Sepsis

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Researchers used online data to model the vaccination rate in communities affected by an outbreak of mumps in Arkansas. Maimuna Majumder/HealthMap; Alyson Hurt/NPR hide caption

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Maimuna Majumder/HealthMap; Alyson Hurt/NPR

In 2015, Medicaid spending topped $552 billion nationwide. People who receive both Medicaid and Medicare and people with disabilities account for more than half of Medicaid spending. Katarzyna Bialasiewicz/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Katarzyna Bialasiewicz/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Limits In GOP Plan Could Shrink Seniors' Long-Term Health Benefits

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Scientists have developed a smartphone app to measure sperm count at home. Hadi Shafiee/Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School hide caption

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Hadi Shafiee/Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School

Former Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer, a Republican, speaks to a crowd of Donald Trump supporters at a Trump campaign rally in Tucson, Ariz., in 2016. Brewer sided with Arizona Democrats to expand Medicaid eligibility in the state under Obamacare. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

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Ross D. Franklin/AP

Repeal Of Health Law Could Force Tough Decisions For Arizona Republicans

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Many people who are on Medicaid are also in college or taking care of relatives, according to health policy analyst Leighton Ku. That would make it harder for them to meet work requirements proposed by the GOP. Courtesy of Milken Institute School of Public Health hide caption

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Courtesy of Milken Institute School of Public Health

It's Not Clear How Many People Could Actually Work To Get Medicaid

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Adding a work requirement to Medicaid could make it harder for people who have health problems from getting access to care, analysts say. Bryce Duffy/Getty Images hide caption

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Bryce Duffy/Getty Images

Women worry that bad things will happen if they exercise while pregnant, but doctors say in almost all cases it's not just safe, but can improve health. Alija/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Alija/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Embryoids like this one are created from stem cells and resemble very primitive human embryos. Scientists are studying them in hopes of learning more about basic human biology and development. Courtesy of Rockefeller University hide caption

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Courtesy of Rockefeller University