A study found 20 percent of children involved in fatal car crashes were improperly restrained, or not restrained at all. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

Keyshla Rivera smiles at her newborn son Jesus as registered nurse Christine Weick demonstrates a baby box before her discharge from Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia in 2016. All mothers who deliver at the hospital receive a box, which functions as a bassinet, in an effort to reduce unsafe sleep practices. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Heading someplace where you could get traveler's diarrhea? Try packing some prophylactic pills containing bismuth subsalicylate, such as Pepto Bismol. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Tips For Staying Healthy When Traveling Abroad

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The federal CHIP program funds health care for almost 9 million children. Terry Vine/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Terry Vine/Blend Images/Getty Images

For children over 1 year old, pediatricians strongly recommend whole fruit instead of juice, because it contains fiber, which slows the absorption of sugar and fills you up the way juice doesn't. KathyDewar/Getty Images hide caption

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KathyDewar/Getty Images

Cabinet-card portrait of brain-injury survivor Phineas Gage (1823–1860), shown holding the tamping iron that injured him. Wikimedia hide caption

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Wikimedia

Why Brain Scientists Are Still Obsessed With The Curious Case Of Phineas Gage

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A scientist holds a bioprosthetic mouse ovary made of gelatin with tweezers. Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine hide caption

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Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Scientists One Step Closer To 3-D-Printed Ovaries To Treat Infertility

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An orangutan mother and her 11-month old infant in Borneo. Orangutans breast-feed offspring off and on for up to eight years. Tim Laman/Science Advances hide caption

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Tim Laman/Science Advances

Orangutan Moms Are The Primate Champs Of Breast-Feeding

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The FDA says blood lead tests manufactured by Magellan Diagnostics can give falsely-low results if they are used with blood drawn from a vein, as opposed to a finger or heel prick. Renphoto/Getty Images/iStock hide caption

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Renphoto/Getty Images/iStock

The Maine Legislature established a high-risk pool for insuring patients with expensive medical conditions, partly funded with a surcharge on all policyholders in the state. J. Stephen Conn/Flickr hide caption

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J. Stephen Conn/Flickr

Secret To Maine's Touted High-Risk Pool? Enough Money

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Tapping into millennials' compassion and activism might be the best way to motivate them to buy health coverage, says Aditi Juneja, a New York University law student. Ashley Pridmore/Courtesy of Youth Radio hide caption

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Ashley Pridmore/Courtesy of Youth Radio

Texas State Capitol in Austin. Nicolas Henderson/Flickr hide caption

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Nicolas Henderson/Flickr

Texas Wants To Set Its Own Rules For Federal Family Planning Funds

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The three candidates, from left, Republican Greg Gianforte, Democrat Rob Quist and Libertarian Mark Wicks, who are vying to fill Montana's only congressional seat. Bobby Caina Calvan/AP hide caption

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Bobby Caina Calvan/AP

Candidates Confront GOP Health Care Bill In Montana Special Election

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A test strip designed to help doctors check a patient's urine for fentanyl is being distributed in the Bronx to encourage users of heroin or other opioids to check what's in their syringe before they inject. Mary Harris/WNYC hide caption

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Mary Harris/WNYC

An Experiment Helps Heroin Users Test Their Street Drugs For Fentanyl

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Secretary of Health and Human Services Tom Price contradicted his agency's online information about the efficacy of medication-assisted treatment for opioid addiction. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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Zach Gibson/Getty Images

President Trump celebrated House passage of legislation to roll back the Affordable Care Act in the Rose Garden of the White House on May 4. NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto via Getty Images