Shots - Health News NPR's online health program

Pricking your fingers may someday be a thing of the past for diabetics as new technologies aim to make blood sugar regulation more convenient. Alden Chadwick/Getty Images hide caption

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Alden Chadwick/Getty Images

Gregory Matthews has glaucoma and uses prescription eyedrops. The dropper's opening creates a bigger drop than he needs, causing him to run out of his medication before the prescription is ready to refill. Matt Roth for ProPublica hide caption

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Matt Roth for ProPublica

President Trump applauds members of the audience before speaking at the Heritage Foundation's annual President's Club meeting on Tuesday evening. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Macaques are social animals, whether in a group enclosure like this one at the Gelsenkircen zoo in western Germany, or in the wild. But many research monkeys are still housed in separate cages. Patrik Stollarz/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Patrik Stollarz/AFP/Getty Images

Scientists Push To House More Lab Monkeys In Pairs

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Dogs may not wash their paws compulsively, but some humans and canines have similar genetic mutations that may influence obsessive behavior. Ute Grabowsky/Photothek via Getty Images hide caption

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Ute Grabowsky/Photothek via Getty Images

Most employers are likely to continue paying for birth control for women. But there are exceptions. Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Getty Images
MCKIBILLO/Getty Images/Imagezoo

Sleep Scientist Warns Against Walking Through Life 'In An Underslept State'

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Esther Lui for NPR

Floating Away Your Anxiety And Stress

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She's not tuning in, she's tuning inward — letting go of stress, or at least trying to, with a mindfulness app on her phone. Photo Illustration by Carolyn Rogers/NPR hide caption

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Photo Illustration by Carolyn Rogers/NPR

Mindfulness Apps Aim To Help People Disconnect From Stress

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Tape worm pills were once advertised as a way to stay thin. Courtesy of Workman Publishing hide caption

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Courtesy of Workman Publishing

'Quackery' Chronicles How Our Love Of Miracle Cures Leads Us Astray

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Hundreds of homes in the Coffey Park neighborhood that were destroyed by the Tubbs Fire on October 11, 2017, in Santa Rosa, California. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

As She Evacuated Patients From The Hospital, Her Home Burned

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New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman says he is joining with peers in California and several other states to file a lawsuit to protect the insurers' subsidies. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The post-fire entryway of the Anova school, which was located in Santa Rosa's Luther Burbank Center for the Arts. Adam Grossberg/KQED hide caption

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Adam Grossberg/KQED

Joseph Lister directing the use of carbolic acid spray in one of his earliest antiseptic surgical operations, circa 1865. Bettmann Archive hide caption

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Bettmann Archive

'The Butchering Art': How A 19th Century Physician Made Surgery Safer

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President Trump talks Thursday about an executive order to ease the way for groups of employers to offer health insurance. Later, the administration said it would halt subsidy payments to insurers. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

The sky over Santa Rosa, Calif., on Monday. Lesley McClurg/KQED hide caption

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Lesley McClurg/KQED

This Week's Air Quality Is Worst On Record For San Francisco Bay Area

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A panel of experts has recommended that the Food and Drug Administration approve a treatment developed by Spark Therapeutics for a rare form of blindness. Spark Therapeutics hide caption

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Spark Therapeutics

FDA Panel Endorses Gene Therapy For A Form Of Childhood Blindness

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Roughly 80 percent of all first strokes arise from risks that people can influence with behavioral changes, doctors say — risks like high blood pressure, smoking and drug abuse. Brenda Muller/Gallo Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Brenda Muller/Gallo Images/Getty Images