Scientists placed two clusters of cultured forebrain cells side by side (each cluster the size of a head of a pin). Within days, the "minibrains" had fused and particular neurons (in green) migrated from the left side to the right side, as subsets of cells do in a real brain. Courtesy of Pasca lab/Stanford University hide caption

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Courtesy of Pasca lab/Stanford University

Doctors have known for a long time that alcohol consumption can cause heart problems. Researchers in Germany used the Oktoberfest beer festival to link binge drinking to abnormal heart rhythms. Dan Herrick/Lonely Planet Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Herrick/Lonely Planet Images/Getty Images

The inmates in Bellevue are awaiting trial for a variety of offenses, ranging from sleeping on the subway to murder. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Psychiatrist Recalls 'Heartbreak And Hope' On Bellevue's Prison Ward

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An illustration of a fetal lamb inside the "artificial womb" device, which mimics the conditions inside a pregnant animal. The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia hide caption

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The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Scientists Create Artificial Womb That Could Help Prematurely Born Babies

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Roughly 2 million of the kids covered by the Children's Health Insurance Program have a chronic health condition, such as asthma. LSOphoto/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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LSOphoto/Getty Images/iStockphoto
Kristen Uroda for NPR

Is It Time For Hearing Aids To Be Sold Over The Counter?

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Angie Wang for NPR

Listen to Anne Webster read her poem

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Anders Osborne at his home studio. The New Orleans bluesman is launching a program to help musicians and others in the industry stay sober in a work environment where that can be difficult. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

'Send Me A Friend': Anders Osborne Helps Musicians Stay Sober On Tour

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Jose Cedillo, a 41-year-old former restaurant worker from Honduras, struggles to get health care for his diabetes. He often finds himself without a job and homeless on the streets of Baltimore. Doug Kapustin/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Doug Kapustin/Kaiser Health News

Prescription drug coverage is one benefit that drives up insurance costs, and one that is very popular with consumers. Hero Images/Getty Images hide caption

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The FDA expanded its warnings about prescription cough and pain medications that contain the narcotics codeine or tramadol. Sujata Jana / EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Don't Give Kids Cough Syrup Or Pain Meds That Contain Codeine, FDA Says

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Rep. Tom MacArthur, R-N.J., has drawn up a proposed amendment to the GOP health care bill, hoping to attract enough support to pass the House. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call Inc./Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call Inc./Getty Images

Small pulses of electricity to the brain have an effect on memory, new research shows. Science Photo Library/SCIEPRO/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library/SCIEPRO/Getty Images

Electrical Stimulation To Boost Memory: Maybe It's All In The Timing

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Dr. James Baker holds a photo of his son, Max, who had been sober for more than a year and was in college when he relapsed after surgery and died of a heroin overdose. Craig LeMoult/WGBH hide caption

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Craig LeMoult/WGBH

How Do Former Opioid Addicts Safely Get Pain Relief After Surgery?

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President Donald Trump signs the Veterans Choice Program Extension and Improvement Act at the White House on Wednesday. Molly Riley/Pool/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Molly Riley/Pool/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Researchers found that a protein in human umbilical cord blood plasma improved learning and memory in older mice, but there's no indication it would work in people. Mike Kemp/Rubberball/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Kemp/Rubberball/Getty Images

Human Umbilical Cord Blood Helps Aging Mice Remember, Study Finds

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In two recent clinical trials of Harvoni and Sovaldi in the treatment of young people between the ages of 12 and 17, the drugs eliminated all traces of the hepatitis C virus in 97 to 100 percent of patients, generally in 12 weeks. Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images

Medical errors are a leading cause of death and injuries in U.S. hospitals, according to the Institute of Medicine. VILevi/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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An organization campaigning against foreign drug imports has deep connections to the lobbying group PhRMA, which includes Eli Lilly, Pfizer and Bayer. Bill Diodato/Getty Images hide caption

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Hannah Berkowitz in her parents' home in West Hartford, Conn. Getting intensive in-home drug treatment is what ultimately helped her get back on track, she and her mom agree. Jack Rodolico/NHPR hide caption

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Jack Rodolico/NHPR

Home-Based Drug Treatment Program Costs Less And Works

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