Cows that consume feed, grass or water contaminated with radioactive iodine-131 can concentrate the element in their milk. Peter Elvidge/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Peter Elvidge/iStockphoto.com

David Wilson of Florida, with the Stop Infant Circumcision Society, works on a readies a sign for a protest in Washington last March. Tom Williams/Roll Call/Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Williams/Roll Call/Getty Images

Everyday Radiation Exposure Is A Tiny Health Risk

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Red #40, Blue #1, Yellow #6 - a rainbow of food dyes. Josh Roulston/Flickr hide caption

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Josh Roulston/Flickr

FDA Probes Link Between Food Dyes, Kids' Behavior

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Ultrasound scan of twins at 4 months. Getty Images hide caption

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Taming The Twin Trend From Fertility Treatments

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Moshe Rute smokes marijuana at the Hadarim nursing home in Kibutz Naan, Israel, in early March. The Israeli government and a private company are distributing cannabis for medicinal purposes to more than 1,800 people in Israel. Uriel Sinai/Getty Images hide caption

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Uriel Sinai/Getty Images