This undated photo was taken of John Hinckley Jr. in front of the White House before he attempted to assassinate President Ronald Reagan in D.C., on March 30, 1981. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Women often save up questions for an annual office visit that they think don't warrant a sick visit to the doctor during the year, research finds. Tim Pannell/Fuse/Getty Images hide caption

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Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine counted health care policy among his chief concerns at a campaign rally for Hillary Clinton in Miami on July 23. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Memorial Hermann Hospital System in Houston was one of very few nationally renowned hospitals to get a five-star ranking from Medicare. Ed Uthman/Flickr hide caption

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Team Of Researchers Dig Up New Compound In An Unlikely Spot: Our Noses

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Once scientists grew these Staphylococcus lugdunensis bacteria in a lab dish, they were able to isolate a compound that's lethal to another strain commonly found in the nose that can make us sick — Staphylococcus aureus. Mostly Harmless/Flickr hide caption

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'Nose-y' Bacteria Could Yield A New Way To Fight Infection

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John Hinckley Jr. is escorted by police in Washington, D.C., following his arrest after shooting and seriously wounding president Ronald Reagan on March 30, 1981. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Walrus, shown here on a drying rack, represents a major source of nutritious food for many in Alaska's St. Lawrence Island. In recent years, warmer temperatures have pushed the sea ice farther from St. Lawrence's shores, making walrus hunting more challenging. This shortfall has led to increased food insecurity on the island. Courtesy of Cara Durr hide caption

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Between 1999 and 2014, the number of deaths in the U.S. from prescribed opioids quadrupled. Meanwhile medical students were getting very little training on how to spot patients who are at risk for addiction, or how to treat it. Matt Lincol/Getty Images/Cultura Exclusive hide caption

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When your health insurer reclassifies a prescription drug you take from tier 1 to tier 2, it can sharply increase the portion of the drug's cost that you're expected to pay. Roberto Machado Noa/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Parkinson's disease, smoking, certain head injuries and even normal aging can influence our sense of smell. But certain patterns of loss in the ability to identify odors seem pronounced in Alzheimer's, researchers say. CSA Images/Color Printstock Collection/Getty Images hide caption

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A Sniff Test For Alzheimer's Checks For The Ability To Identify Odors

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Four sheep cloned from the same genetic material as Dolly roam the paddocks in Nottingham, England. The University of Nottingham hide caption

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'Sister Clones' Of Dolly The Sheep Are Alive And Kicking

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New drugs like Harvoni effectively cure hepatitis C, but they haven't yet been approved for use in children. Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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