President Gerald Ford and First Lady Betty Ford, with Jack and Susan Ford at their Alexandra, Va. home on August 12, 1974. The Ford family lived there for ten days until the executive mansion was ready. David Hume Kennerly/Getty Images hide caption

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This installation at the Tower of London will ultimately feature 888,246 ceramic poppies, honoring the soldiers from Britain and the British colonies who died in World War I. Rich Preston/NPR hide caption

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The Titan II intercontinental-range missile, pictured in 1965, sits ready for launch on its 150-feet-deep underground launchpad. "The one warhead on a Titan II had three times the explosive force of all the bombs used by all the armies in the second world war combined — including both atomic bombs," says investigative reporter Eric Schlosser. Keystone/Getty Images hide caption

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Estela de Carlotto (center), head of the Argentine human rights organization that seeks to reunite babies stolen decades ago with their biological relatives, announced on Monday she had located her 36-year-old grandson. Martin Zabala/Xinhua/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Martin Zabala/Xinhua/Landov

William Bryant Davidson was arrested for the shooting of Richard Joe Butler, along with Billy Woods and the Klansman Ed Fuller. No one ever went to trial in Butler's shooting. Photo Courtesy of David Ridgen/National Archives hide caption

itoggle caption Photo Courtesy of David Ridgen/National Archives

Illustration from Caresse Crosby's patent application for a "backless brassiere." Born Mary Phelps Jacob, Crosby changed her name after she sold her bra business to the Warner Brothers Corset Co. U.S. Patent and Trademark Office hide caption

itoggle caption U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

A portrait of then-Sen. Warren G. Harding a few years prior to being elected president in 1920. Harding typically ranks near the bottom of U.S. presidents — but a steamy trove of love letters is putting him back in the public eye. Library of Congress hide caption

itoggle caption Library of Congress