Race And The Controversial History Of 'Stand Your Ground' Laws

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/517181355/517181356" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

David Oyelowo and Rosamund Pike play real-life couple Seretse and Ruth Khama in A United Kingdom. Stanislav Honzik/Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation hide caption

toggle caption
Stanislav Honzik/Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation

David Oyelowo On The Real 'United Kingdom' Marriage And Its Diplomatic Fallout

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/517029375/517086536" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

From happy Neolithic-era accident to inspiration for student protests to tabletop staple, butter has had quite the ride over the past 10,000 years. A new book tells the story. Lew Rovertson/Getty Images/StockFood hide caption

toggle caption
Lew Rovertson/Getty Images/StockFood
Ryan Lash/TED

Eric Haseltine: Can The Past Guide Us To Future Scientific Breakthroughs?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/516727050/516876864" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Auto Workers' Union To Launch 'Buy American' Campaign

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/516787778/516787782" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jane Givens searches for her father, Phil, and sister, Biddy, through an ad placed in Cincinnati's The Colored Citizen in 1866. Courtesy of Last Seen hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Last Seen

After Slavery, Searching For Loved Ones In Wanted Ads

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/516651689/516695512" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

#AskCokie: Listeners Want To Know About Congressional Oversight

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/516582908/516582909" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Pat McCawley (left) and Eric Emerson look at a drawing of an asylum built in Columbia, S.C., in the 1820s. Cooper McKim/South Carolina Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Cooper McKim/South Carolina Public Radio

An Attempt To Save South Carolina's Historical Documents Is Destroying Them

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/515410087/516488446" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A $35 million project is underway at Monticello to re-create or restore spaces where Thomas Jefferson's slaves worked and lived. ©Thomas Jefferson Foundation at Monticello hide caption

toggle caption
©Thomas Jefferson Foundation at Monticello

Monticello Restoration Project Puts An Increased Focus On Jefferson's Slaves

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/516292305/516292310" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This 1945 photo provided by the family shows Shizuko Ina, with her son Kiyoshi (left) and daughter Satsuki in an internment camp in Tule Lake, Calif. This photograph was taken by a family friend who was a soldier at the time, since cameras were considered contraband at the camp. Satsuki was born at the camp. Courtesy of the Ina family/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of the Ina family/AP

How 'Little Tokyo' Of Los Angeles Changed Into 'Bronzeville' And Back Again

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/516064700/516064701" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Many of the Japanese Americans incarcerated at Tule Lake had been farmers before the war. At camp, they were employed as field workers, often for $12 a month. Here, incarcerees work in a carrot field. Densho: The Japanese American Legacy Project via The National Archives hide caption

toggle caption
Densho: The Japanese American Legacy Project via The National Archives

This image made by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope shows part of a group of five galaxies known as Stephan's Quintet. NASA, ESA, Hubble SM4 ERO Team /AP hide caption

toggle caption
NASA, ESA, Hubble SM4 ERO Team /AP

'Are We Alone?' Churchill Concludes It's Likely Life Circles Other Suns

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/515863313/515921457" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Vintage Seminole patchwork on display at the home of Patsy West, in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Courtesy of Will O'Leary hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Will O'Leary

Seminole Patchwork: Admiration And Appropriation

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/510241789/516137881" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An early draft of Card III in Hermann Rorschach's psychological test. Archiv und Sammlung Hermann Rorschach, University Library of Bern hide caption

toggle caption
Archiv und Sammlung Hermann Rorschach, University Library of Bern

How Hermann Rorschach's 'Inkblots' Took On A Life Of Their Own

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/515449428/515841166" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Winston Churchill Ponders Extraterrestrial Life In Newly Discovered Essay

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/515728580/515728581" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Freda DeKnight was Ebony's first food editor and author of a best-selling African-American cookbook in the 1940s. Her recipes presented a vision of black America that was often invisible in mainstream media. Sierra Nicole Rhoden/Chicago Tribune hide caption

toggle caption
Sierra Nicole Rhoden/Chicago Tribune

Israeli archaeologists are excavating ruins of a residential quarter dating back to the 2nd century B.C. at the Nebi Samuel site in the West Bank. According to an Israeli-Palestinian agreement, the status of the West Bank – and the artifacts found there – are to be negotiated in eventual peace talks. Daniel Estrin/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Daniel Estrin/NPR

In West Bank, Israeli And Palestinian Archaeologists Both Lay Claim To Heritage

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/511595881/515531771" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

#AskCokie: Listeners Ask About Rule 19 That Silenced Sen. Warren

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/515336588/515336589" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript