Costume designer Walter Plunkett made an intricate watercolor design for Scarlett O'Hara's famous curtain dress in Gone with the Wind. Courtesy of AMPAS hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of AMPAS

The USS Indianapolis (CA-35), pictured off the Mare Island Navy Yard, Calif., in July 1945. U.S. Navy/National Archives via Wikimedia Commons hide caption

itoggle caption U.S. Navy/National Archives via Wikimedia Commons

The Harwell Dekatron Computer in Bletchley Park is one of the massive machines used by Matt Parker in his Imitation Archive music. Courtesy of the National Museum of Computing hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of the National Museum of Computing

Willis Conover, an expert on jazz, broadcasts "Music USA" from his Voice of America studio in Washington in March 1959. AP hide caption

itoggle caption AP

Author and activist Bill McKibben paddles toward Follensby Pond in New York's Adirondack Mountains, along the route followed by Ralph Waldo Emerson in the summer of 1858. Julia Ferguson/NCPR hide caption

itoggle caption Julia Ferguson/NCPR

The architecture of downtown Charleston, S.C., is modeled after its sister colony, Bridgetown, Barbados. Many of Charleston's first settlers were white voyagers and black slaves from the island. Kenya Downs for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Kenya Downs for NPR

Around the Nation

From Crape Myrtles To Long Houses, Charleston Is A 'Big Barbados'

This South Carolina city has its architectural and economic roots in the Caribbean.

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Caillebotte's 1875 painting The Floor Scrapers was rejected by the elite Salon, but it was the work that launched his career. RMN-Grand Palais/Art Resour/Courtesy National Gallery of Art hide caption

itoggle caption RMN-Grand Palais/Art Resour/Courtesy National Gallery of Art

Interior view of a room with a rotunda ceiling during an auction of slaves, artwork and goods. William Henry Brooke, 1772-1860/Courtesy of The Historic New Orleans Collection hide caption

itoggle caption William Henry Brooke, 1772-1860/Courtesy of The Historic New Orleans Collection

A rider nurses his elbow, and his pride, after a fall. Bicycle riding was rough in the early days — but this gentleman was lucky. He could have been on the Tour de France, where competitors busted their wheels on broken glass thrown by rowdy fans. Library of Congress hide caption

itoggle caption Library of Congress